FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from GA, 05/02/18

FHB risk remains low across Georgia. Wheat in south and central Georgia is approaching maturity and should no longer be vulnerable to FHB infections. Limited FBH damage, if any, was observed this year in research trials in Plains, GA and commercial fields in south GA. Wheat planted on time in the Piedmont area is past flowering, reducing the potential for FHB infections. One sample with confirmed FHB originated in Grady county in extreme south GA where the infection was minimal.

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from AL, 04/30/18

Wheat in South and Central AL is no longer vulnerable to scab but some late wheat in North AL is now flowering. Scab risk in that area remains low. So far, little if any scab damage has been observed in research trials being conducted in SW or SE AL. Septoria glume blotch intensification has continued in SW AL with noticeable leaf damage being seen in wheat in the dough stage. Very limited leaf rust damage has occurred in extreme SW AL. No disease activity was noted in a wheat variety trial in SE AL. Overall, disease pressure has been very light in wheat across AL for 2018.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 04/30/18

As wheat starts flowering in the region, it is time to consider whether or not to make a fungicide application for Fusarium head blight (FHB). Currently, risk is low in most parts of Virginia. There are a few exceptions, including portions of the Eastern Shore, where risk is moderate to high. The most effective fungicides for control of FHB and DON are Caramba (metconazole), Prosaro (prothioconazole + tebuconazole), and Proline (prothioconazole). Less expensive triazoles such as Tilt (propiconazole) and Folicur (tebuconazole) will provide some control, but if FHB risk is high these fungicides are unlikely to prevent unacceptable levels of DON contamination. Keep in mind that fungicides containing a strobilurin should not be applied after the flag leaf stage since they can increase DON contamination. To maximize their effectiveness, fungicides for FHB and DON control should be applied at early flowering or up to one week later. Fungicides that control FHB and DON will also control foliar diseases including powdery mildew, leaf rust, stripe rust, and leaf blotch. Stripe rust has been found in NC and was recently reported from a single field in Warsaw, VA so be sure to scout susceptible varieties for this disease. For specific wheat disease management recommendations or assistance with disease identification, contact Dr. Hillary L. Mehl (hlmehl@vt.edu).

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 04/30/18

The cool weather this year has led to a little slower than usual progress of wheat. In the Southern part of MD, wheat has booted, and should be heading out soon. In the north wheat is at second node and flag leaf stag, predictably around 2-3 weeks away from flowering. We are lucky so far for not having any major disease incidence, except for a few powdery mildew specks, which will go off soon due to the dry weather conditions forecast for this week. Currently the FHB risk is low in the state. However, the growers are advised to keep an eye on the FHB forecasts in the coming weeks as wheat will enter flowering, the most vulnerable stage for scab.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from TN, 04/26/18

The wet weather in Tennessee are conducive for spore production. If wet and moderately warm temperatures continue into flowering, wheat will be at increased risk for FHB infection and fungicide application would be recommended. Best fungicide timing is at initial bloom/flowering (Feekes 10.5.1), which relates to at least 50% of the heads blooming in a field. Although applications made 5 to 6 days after initial bloom can also provide a benefit in reducing FHB and mycotoxin levels.

Only fungicide products that are solo triazoles (FRAC or fungicide group 3 on the label) should be applied for prevention/management of Head Scab. Products that contain a strobilurin can increase the mycotoxin levels in FHB infected wheat. The best products currently available for reducing Scab symptoms and DON levels are Caramba and Prosaro. A more comprehension fungicide table can be found at UTcrops.com (Wheat fungicide Table).

--Heather Young-Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 04/26/18

Although reports of powdery mildew continue to come in from around the state, perhaps the more important news is that other foliar diseases have started to become active. On Apr-24, Septoria tritici blotch (Figure 1) was prevalent on lower leaves throughout the variety trial near Walters, OK. Walters is located in southwestern Oklahoma about 20 miles south of Lawton & 10 miles north of the Texas border. Although interesting, Septoria tritici blotch is not the disease of concern as in this trial there also was active leaf rust on lower leaves (Figure 2) and stripe rust on the leaves just below the flag leaf. Dr. Brett Carver (OSU Professor/Wheat Breeder) and Branden Watson (OSU PaSS Graduate Student) also reported active stripe rust at various levels in trials located near Chickasha, OK in central Oklahoma (Figure 3). The photo from Dr. Carver (the right photo in Figure 3) shows much more severe stripe rust than was seen near Walters. These observations indicate that both stripe and leaf rust are increasing through southern and central Oklahoma. This activity will increase through the coming weeks as the forecast indicates continued moisture (rains and dew) coupled with moderate temperature. Wheat in southern Oklahoma was approaching or was actively flowering, so the option of using a fungicide to protect yield potential either is at hand or may be too late. Most fungicides labeled for wheat rust control must be applied by the start of flowering (Feekes’ growth stage 10.5). The only fungicides I know of that have a label allowing for a later application are Tilt, Quilt Xcel, and Trivapro, which can be applied up to Feekes’ 10.5.4 (end of flowering with the kernel watery ripe). In addition to these application deadlines, there often are required pre-harvest intervals so you must allow for a specific number of days to elapse between application of the fungicide and harvest. For specific information, please consult the label for the fungicide.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 04/25/18

Wheat in southeast Kansas will likely reach the heading and flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to infection by the Fusarium fungus over the next 7 to 10 days. The risk maps currently indicate the risk of severe head blight is low because of dry conditions in early April. The risk of disease may increase rapidly over the next week as rain moves through the area.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/25/18

Welcome to the Fusarium head blight prediction center. This site provides daily estimates of disease risk for many of the areas of the US where head blight is a problem. The current focus of the prediction effort is on AR, MO, TN, KY and NC. Wheat in these states are at growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection or will likely reach these stages in the next 7 -10 days. The current risk maps indicate a low risk of disease because of dry weather in early April. The risk may increase over the next week as rain moves through some areas of the central US.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 04/24/18

Currently, PA and most of Delaware are at a “low” risk of scab development because it has been so cool. The exception is the lower eastern portion of Sussex County, DE which is just now starting to experience weather conditions that nudge it into "medium" risk territory. While most of the wheat in PA is too young to worry about scab right now, those of you wishing to apply a fungicide along with your growth regulator spray should scout for powdery mildew before doing so. We generally recommend only spraying for this disease if 5-10% of the fully expanded upper leaves are infected, and because it has been so cool, your wheat will probably not meet this threshold. Those of you in Delaware are closer to heading, and if you are growing barley, you may already be there. Keep a close watch on the FHB Risk Assessment Tool as warmer temperatures and humidity may push your risk higher over the next week. If you decide to spray your barley, target your Caramba or Prosaro application at heading. For wheat, wait until early flowering for your applications.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/23/18

For wheat flowering now, scab risk is low across North Carolina due to recent dry weather. Rain predicted for April 23-28 will make conditions more conducive to scab for wheat flowering in the coming 10 days. However, considering the amount of moisture predicted, risk for wheat flowering later this week and next week will likely remain low in most of North Carolina, with the likely exception being the Tidewater area. If your wheat is flowering in the next 2 weeks, monitor scab risk closely, especially if you have susceptible varieties.

Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. For scab, the most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs