FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from OK, 04/19/19

This past week I had phone conversations with two individuals from southwestern OK. Both indicated they are starting to see a bit more rust (primarily leaf rust) across southwestern OK, and with wheat approaching heading they are considering making arrangements to spray.

Moving into central OK, David Nowlin (Extn. Educator; Caddo County in central Oklahoma) reported that on Monday, April 15th when he was at the variety trial near Apache, OK, many of the varieties were just starting to head. He found no rust at the variety trial, but continues to see tan spot/septoria. He also indicated the trial had been sprayed for aphids, so there were no aphids.

Also early this past week, Robert Calhoun (Senior Agriculturalist, Plant & Soil Sciences, OkSU) found stripe rust at the Experiment Station located in north-central OK near Lahoma. Robert indicated the incidence of stripe rust was extremely low. Today (Friday, 19-Apr) I looked at wheat west of Stillwater to Hennessey (about 50 miles) and then north to Waukomis (about 20 miles). Wheat along this route and around Stillwater is between growth stages 9-10 (flag leaf fully emerged to boot stage). I didn’t see rust anywhere I stopped. I did see some tan spot in one field that had obvious wheat residue, and moderate powdery mildew on lower leaves in one field. By far the most common “find” was aphids – mostly bird cherry-oat, but also some greenbug. I observed some associated spots that I suspect are barley yellow dwarf, but these “spots” were fairly scattered and not numerous. Brian Olson (Senior Agriculturalist; OkSU) spent Friday morning spraying at the station near Lahoma and indicated he did not find any rust and that heads were not yet in the boot.

In summary, foliar diseases are still at low incidence across Oklahoma but there is the indication that leaf rust is increasing across southern OK. Given the present and short-term forecast for temperature and moisture, I expect leaf rust to increase. These conditions also are favorable for stripe rust and powdery mildew, but the seeming sparseness of these two foliar diseases at this point in time indicates that in a typical year we are more at risk from leaf rust than we are from stripe rust or powdery mildew.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from GA, 04/18/19

Wheat scab risk is high in most of the state. It’s especially sensitive timing for mid Georgia and the Piedmont area. If wheat is flowering, apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Labeled fungicides include Caramba, Prosaro, Proline, Folicur, Tilt, and Miravis Ace. The most effective products are Prosaro, Caramba, Proline and Miravis Ace (as per NCERA 184 wheat fungicide table). Avoid applying a strobilurin-containing fungicide.

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 04/15/19

Wheat in southeastern and south-central Kansas is at flag leaf emergence and will reach the growth stages critical for Fusarium in roughly 2 weeks. We will be monitoring for the risk of disease and provide more updates soon.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/15/19

Wheat in AR, TN and NC should be approaching the critical stages of growth over the next 7 to 10 days. There may also be some areas of northern LA, MS and AL that are still at vulnerable growth stages. At this point, the risk of severe disease is low or moderate, in most of these areas. There is a region of southern MS, AL and GA that appears to be a moderate or high risk, however, wheat in this area is likely past the most vulnerable growth stages.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/15/19

Pockets of medium to high scab risk for wheat flowering this week have opened up in southeast NC, specifically Onslow, Pender, and adjacent counties. Late-planted fields are likely not near flowering yet, but those planted on time may be. Fungicides are significantly less effective when applied prior to flowering. Apply fungicide at early flowering. If necessary, up to 7 days later should be almost as effective. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, Miravis Ace, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from AL, 04/14/19

So far this spring, overall disease activity in wheat across much of Alabama has been light. Neither leaf or yellow rust has been observed in any of the cultivar trials located around the state, while light Septoria leaf spot was diagnosed in wheat cultivar screening trials in North AL. Scab risk is high over SW AL but medium to low across the rest of the state. Most likely, much of the wheat in that area has already flowers and is at low risk for scab development. Wheat in Central and North AL is flowering now.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 04/12/19

During this past week, the first observation of stripe rust was made in Oklahoma in southern/southwestern Oklahoma in Jackson County where Gary Strickland (Extn Educator; Jackson County in SW OK) and Mike Schulz (Altus Station Superintendent) found a low incidence of this rust on wheat in a variety demo and in a producer’s field. Leaf rust also was observed at a low incidence as was leaf spotting due to Septoria/Stagonospora. David Nowlin (Extn. Educator; Caddo County in central Oklahoma) also continued to observe leaf spotting. In scouting variety demos in Washita and Kiowa Counties, Heath Sanders (SW Area Extn Agron Speclst) did not find any powdery mildew, leaf rust or stripe rust. Around Stillwater, not much has changed. Wheat is mostly between growth stages 8-9 (flag leaves emerging to flag leaves fully emerged). I can still find hot spots of aphids (primarily bird cherry-oat aphids) along with scattered powdery mildew and a low incidence of leaf rust. Leaf spot diseases also are scattered and only on lower leaves. Finding stripe rust this late and at this low of an incidence typically indicates that stripe rust will not be much of a problem this year in Oklahoma especially when coupled with limited reports of this rust in Texas. However, leaf rust still has plenty of time to develop, especially if temperature and free moisture on leaves continues to be favorable.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/10/19

This is the first North Carolina small grain scab risk commentary for the 2019 season. In most of NC, wheat is still 1 to 5 weeks from the period when Fusarium infects heads, which is flowering. Barley has headed or will soon head in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Currently, scab risk is low in all the wheat- and barley-growing areas of NC. The forecast holds only a little rain, which means risk should remain low for the next 10-14 days. There is no need to treat for scab when risk is low at flowering. Updates will be provided for the next 6 weeks.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from GA, 04/10/19

Wheat scab risk is moderate to high in several southwest GA counties. Crawford, Lamar, Monroe, Macon and Upson counties show moderate risk. If the risk in your area is moderate to high and wheat is flowering, apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Avoid applying a strobilurin-containing fungicide. FHB labeled fungicides include Caramba, Prosaro, Proline, Folicur, Tilt, and Miravis Ace. The most effective products are Prosaro, Caramba, Proline and Miravis Ace (see NCERA 184 wheat fungicide table for reference).

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/10/19

The focus of the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center moves North this week. Wheat in AR, TN and NC should be approaching the critical stages of growth over the next 7 to 14 days. There may also be some areas of northern LA, MS and AL that are still at vulnerable growth stages. At this point, the risk of severe disease is low, in most of these areas. There is a region of southern LA and MS that appears to be a moderate or high risk, however, wheat in this area is likely past the most vulnerable growth stages.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs