FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from PA, 05/09/19

Wheat that is flowering now or in the next several days in southern PA should be sprayed for scab if at all possible. Weather conditions are conducive for infection in most regions of the state. If spraying at early flowering is not possible, a fungicide application up to 6 days later will provide some suppression of the disease. Keep an eye on your label to understand post-harvest interval restrictions.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/08/19

Prolonged wet weather has lingered over much of the state in the past few weeks as the southern half of the state approached flowering and is predicted into the coming week as the northern half of the approaches flowering. At this time, conditions in much of the state place the more susceptible winter wheat varieties at high risk for FHB development. Moderate risk levels are predicted for the moderately susceptible and moderately resistant varieties are at moderate risk. Into the coming week, humidity is expected to remain high across much of the state meaning the risk for FHB development remains high likely into the coming week. Now is the critical time to make decisions regarding fungicide applications. There are several fungicides labeled for the control and management of FHB in the triazole class (including Prosaro and Caramba) which are most effective when applied at Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of the plants in the field are beginning to flower). While fungicides provide the most effective control when applied at Feekes 10.5.1, university research has shown that a fungicide applied up to 5 days after Feekes 10.5.1 may provide similar control. It is important to note that strobilurin-containing fungicides are not labelled for control of Fusarium head blight and, if applied at later growth stages such as Feekes 10.5.1, may result in increased DON levels in the grain. Always follow harvest restrictions and label instructions when applying fungicides.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 05/07/19

Fusarium head blight risk is continuing to increase in parts of Virginia. Much of the wheat in the southern part of the state is past the vulnerable flowering stage, but wheat that is at or about to enter flowering may be at risk. Consider applying a fungicide if risk is moderate to high, especially on susceptible or moderately susceptible varieties. Wheat that has completed flowering is no longer at risk. Fungicides should be applied at early flowering or up to one week later. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide since this can increase DON contamination. Recommended fungicides include Prosaro, Caramba, Proline, and Miravis Ace.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 05/07/19

There is a large area of the Mid.West that is at moderate and high risk for Fusarium head blight. Local reports from this area indicate that wheat is at or approaching growth stages that are most vulnerable to disease in southeastern KS, southern MO, Southern IL, and parts of KY. Producers in these areas should monitor the weather conditions carefully. Fungicide applications may be needed to suppress disease in these areas. Selecting the state of interest from the menu to the left of the map will zoom the map to show more detail and display commentary from local disease specialists.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 05/07/19

Wheat in southeastern and south-central Kansas is at heading stages of development. Wheat in these areas will reach the growth stages critical for Fusarium in roughly week to 3-5 days. The model is indicating moderate or high risk of severe disease just as we head into the most vulnerable period of growth. The risk is likely to persist or increase if these regions continue to receive frequent rainfall and extended periods of high relative humidity. Growers in southeastern and south central Kansas should be monitoring situation carefully and planning to apply a fungicide if weather conditions remain favorable. Care should be taken to select an effective fungicide for management of FHB with Prosaro, Caramba and Miravis Ace being the best options. Many other fungicides are less effective or are not labeled for Fusarium suppression.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KY, 05/06/19

Wheat fields in Kentucky are now either at beginning flowering (Feekes growth stage 10.5.1) or within a few days past Feekes 10.5.1. Due to the recent rain events, the risk of Fusarium head blight has elevated to medium and high in a few areas of the state. Fungicides that are effective in managing Fusarium head blight and the associated mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON; vomitoxin) include Caramba (BASF Corp.), Prosaro (Bayer CropScience), and Miravis Ace (Syngenta Crop Protection). In general, in university research trials, the most effective application timing for management of Fusarium head blight and DON has been Feekes 10.5.1 (beginning flowering), but applications 4-6 days after Feekes 10.5.1 also have been found to be similarly effective. Be sure to read and follow fungicide labels, including pre-harvest interval restrictions before making any fungicide applications.

--Carl Bradley, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Kentucky

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/06/19

Recent wet and mild weather is driving up scab risk across Pennsylvania. Keep a close eye out for anthers emerging from progressing wheat and consider your spray decisions. Sprays prior to heading do not suppress scab, but one labeled fungicide, Miravis Ace, may be applied at 50% heading. The best control with all fungicides will result from spraying at the first sign of anthers. Caramba and Prosaro (Group 3) or Miravis Ace (Group 3 + 7), give good control of scab as well as most leaf and head diseases. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/06/19

With the recent showers in the state the risk of Fusarium Head Blight appears to be high. In the Eastern Shore wheat is currently flowering (50% of the main tillers showing yellow anthers). Growers with their wheat flowering are advised to spray head scab fungicides (Prosaro/ Caramba/ Miravis-Ace). These fungicides do not need to be tank mixed with another product for spraying. The fungicide products should be applied at the full rate recommended by the manufacturers. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be sprayed at this stage. Aerial application at a rate of 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre with 300-350 um droplet size is recommended. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30°-45° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. In the Northern counties, we are still around 7-10 days away from flowering.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/06/19

Wheat is starting to flower in parts of S Illinois, and the forecast is calling for an increase in temperatures coupled with some potential rains over the next 3-4 days in some areas. I expect that, given the amount of rain we have had over the past 3 weeks, coupled with recent weather, that we may see some elevation in FHB risk this week if the rains move through as expected. Remember- the best time to make applications is when 50% of main tillers start flowering through roughly 6 days from the start of this point. Recommended fungicides for FHB suppression include Caramba, Miravis Ace, Prosaro, and Proline. These products also will have activity against glume blotch and rusts. Symptoms of FHB will start to show up 18-24 days from the start of flowering, depending on temperatures and other factors.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 05/03/19

Wheat in AR, Southern MO, TN, and Western KY is likely at or near the critical stages of growth. At this point, the forecasting model indicates that the risk of severe disease is low in most of these areas. The model currently indicates a large portion of IL, IN and OH are at a moderate or high risk of severe disease. Local reports from this area indicate that wheat in this area is not at flowering or early stages of grain fill growth stages that are most vulnerable to disease. Producers in these areas should monitor the weather conditions carefully. Fungicide applications may be needed to suppress disease if the risk remains high. Selecting the state of interest from the menu to the left of the map will zoom the map to show more detail and display commentary from local disease specialists.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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