FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from PA, 05/17/19

Despite a window of lovely weather Friday, infection risk remains high across PA. Please monitor your crop development and consider a fungicide at flowering.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 05/16/19

I started this past week on Monday (13-May) at the variety trial at Chickasha, OK, where wheat was mostly full kernel watery to milky. Stripe rust was the most prevalent foliar disease, but overall was not extremely heavy in the variety trial. Septoria/Stagonospora was a close second to stripe rust, and actually was more widespread than stripe rust but for the most part was only on the lower and mid leaves. Leaf rust also was present, but overall seemed less than stripe rust. From Chickasha, I moved to Tipton, OK in southwestern OK where the wheat was mostly about soft dough. Leaves here were quickly turning and showed a combination of stripe rust, leaf rust, and Septoria/Stagonospora. However, varieties and lines with good resistance stood out. On Tuesday (14-May), I was at the field day near El Reno in central OK (25 miles west and a bit south of OKC). Wheat here was at the end of flowering to full kernel-watery. Overall diseases were light with Septoria/Stagonospora on lower and mid leaves and some stripe and leaf rust on upper leaves. Powdery mildew also was present, but mostly only on certain varieties. Next, a demonstration was visited near Minco, OK (about 20 miles west). This demo was planted quite late (early December), and was mostly at flowering. The foliar disease situation was basically the same, that is, some stripe and leaf rust along with some powdery mildew and Septoria/Stagonospora.

From Minco, I moved north to the variety trial at Kingfisher, OK (30 miles NW of OKC). The explosion of leaf rust at Kingfisher was impressive, and finally fit with my expectations for the occurrence of leaf rust this year.

Finally, there may be some additional diseases to watch for this year given the extended cool and wet spring. This includes several diseases, but primarily bacterial streak (black chaff) and Fusarium head blight (head scab). Dr. John Fenderson (Technical Product Manager; Bayer Crop Science-WestBred) indicated on 9-May that he observed major infections of bacterial streak across central Texas. Dr. Brett Carver (OSU Wheat Breeder) also indicated seeing symptoms consistent with bacterial streak at the field day near Okmulgee in eastern OK earlier this week. Symptoms of bacterial streak are somewhat similar to Septoria/Stagonospora, and could be overlooked if both are present. However, the head symptoms should be more discernable, and currently I have not seen symptoms such as this across central and western OK.

Fusarium head blight typically occurs in eastern/northeastern OK every year, and this spring has been favorable for this disease. Wheat heads will be totally or partially bleached and contain shriveled and often pinkish or salmon colored seed. To get more information on head scab, see OSU PSS-2145 (Fusarium Head Blight (Head Scab) of Wheat: Questions and Answers – available at http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-6307/PSS-2145...) and OSU PSS-2136 (Considerations when Rotating Wheat behind Corn – available at http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-5436/PSS-2136...). Another outstanding resource regarding Fusarium head blight is the “Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center” at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/. At this site there are resources describing the disease as well an assessment tool that can be used to help predict when spraying is critical to help prevent Fusarium head blight.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 05/16/19

There is a large area of the Mid. West that is at moderate and high risk for Fusarium head blight. Local reports from this area indicate that wheat is at or approaching growth stages that are most vulnerable to disease in the central regions of KS, MO, IL, Southern IN and OH. Parts of MD and DE may also be at risk. Producers in these areas should monitor the weather conditions carefully and consult with local extension experts or consultants for more informaton. Fungicide applications may be needed to suppress disease in these areas. Selecting the state of interest from the menu to the left of the map will zoom to show more detail and display commentary from local disease specialists.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 05/16/19

Wheat in south central and central Kansas is at heading and flowering stages of development. Wheat in north central KS is now moving through the boot and heading stages of growth and will likely reach the critical growth stages in 5-7 days. The model is indicating moderate or high risk of severe disease as we move into the most vulnerable period of growth. The risk is likely to persist or increase if forecasts for rainfall and extended periods of high relative humidity develop as expected. Growers in central Kansas should be monitoring the situation carefully and planning to apply a fungicide if weather conditions remain favorable. Care should be taken to select an effective fungicide for management of FHB with Prosaro, Caramba and Miravis Ace.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/15/19

Risk for FHB development remains high for much of the state, especially for varieties that might be considered susceptible or moderately susceptible to FHB that may be flowering or approaching flowering in the next few days. In the coming days, FHB risk is predicted to wane slightly in some areas going into the weekend but will remain at moderate to high levels for a majority of the state. However, with more wet weather predicted in the coming week, that risk could very likely increase again. Fungicides are an integral part of an effective integrated pest management program for managing FHB and associated mycotoxins. Fungicides in the triazole class such as Prosaro or Caramba are most effective when applied at 50% flowering, or Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of heads are flowering) but can be applied up to 5 days after flowering and still provide similar control. Strobilurin-containing fungicides are NOT labeled for the control of FHB and may result in increased DON levels in the grain. It is important to always follow harvest restrictions and label instructions when applying fungicides.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from DE, 05/14/19

Wheat in lower Delaware has finished flowering and wheat in Kent and New Castle counties range from head emergence through flowering. The entire state is at high FHB risk. If your wheat is flowering (yellow anthers visible on 50% of main tillers), it is advised to make a fungicide application for management of FHB. The advised window for fungicide application is flowering until 4-5 days after flowering. Fungicides for FHB include Caramba, Miravis-Ace, and Prosaro. Fungicides containing strobilurins should be avoided at this growth stage. Applications should be made at the full recommended rate in 15 gallons per acre (gpa) with 300-350 um droplet size for ground application and 5 gpa recommended for aerial application. Spray nozzles should be pointed toward the grain heads (30-45° angle from horizontal), with forward and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray (Twinjet).

--akoehler, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/14/19

Wheat in the Eastern shore has finished flowering, except for a few late planted fields. Up in the north, wheat is anywhere from head emergence to beginning of flowering. The FHB risk for Maryland is high across the state. If your wheat is flowering (50% of the main tillers showing yellow anthers), it is advised to spray fungicides for scab. The best stage recommended for spraying fungicides is early flowering or within 4-5 days of that. The fungicides effective for FHB are Prosaro/ Caramba/ Miravis-Ace. These fungicides do not need to be tank mixed with another product for spraying. The fungicide products should be applied at the full rate recommended by the manufacturers. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be sprayed at this stage. Aerial application at a rate of 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre with 300-350 um droplet size is recommended. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30°-45° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/13/19

The majority of PA is under high scab infection risk this week. This risk will persist as long as conditions remain damp. If your wheat will be flowering in the next several days, be prepared to target a fungicide application at early flower. If leaves dry sufficiently to allow for application but more rain is threatening, know that most of the scab products become rainfast very shortly after application (even within 15 min), and so you needn’t worry about rain washing your product off. If you have missed the early flowering timing, a fungicide may still be applied 5-7 days following the ideal target and still provide some scab protection. Be sure to observe label restrictions.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/13/19

We continue in a pattern of high humidity that will favor FHB this week. Much wheat in the south has flowered over the last 7-10 days, and wheat in the central part of the state will likely enter flowering this week, especially if temperatures hit the 80's as forecast. If you are entering flowering this week, continue to monitor the FHB prediction center and forecast. Remember that fungicide applications of Caramba, Prosaro, Proline, and Miravis Ace applied from Feekes 10.5.1 (when approx. 50% of MAIN tillers start to flower) through 5-6 days from the start of this point provide the greatest efficacy for suppressing FHB. Follow all label guidelines.

For those who flowered last week, FHB symptoms will start to appear 18-24 days after flowering, depending on variety and weather. Scouts and growers should plan on scouting fields around this time to assess potential impact of FHB on their crop. More information on harvest based management options to consider for FHB infected fields can be found after 10 am on 5/13/19 at http://cropdisease.cropsciences.illinois.edu/

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 05/12/19

Wheat in southeastern and south-central Kansas is at heading and flowering stages of development. Wheat in central KS is now moving through the boot and heading stages of growth and will likely reach the critical growth stages in 3-5 days. The model is indicating moderate or high risk of severe disease just as we move into the most vulnerable period of growth. The risk is likely to persist or increase if these regions continue to receive frequent rainfall and extended periods of high relative humidity. Growers in southeastern and central Kansas should be monitoring situation carefully and planning to apply a fungicide if weather conditions remain favorable. Care should be taken to select an effective fungicide for management of FHB with Prosaro, Caramba and Miravis Ace being the best options. Many other fungicides are less effective or are not labeled for Fusarium suppression.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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