FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from MD, 05/19/17

Wheat is Maryland is now in the grain filling stage. With the showers that we had at flowering, there are high chances of substantial Fusarium Head Blight incidences. Consequently, tombstones (shriveled scabby kernels) and DON content are going to be a concern for the growers. To assess the incidence of FHB, you may randomly pick 20-25 heads of wheat per 1-2 acres and count the spikes having bleached spikelets. Harvesting from fields with high levels of FHB incidence should be done with higher fan speeds to remove lighter tombstone kernels. The farmers are advised to get the DON content analyzed in the grain before taking it to the market.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from DE, 05/15/17

We are through flowering in Delaware and Maryland wheat. Growers should assess wheat for FHB severity approximately 18-24 days after flowering or fungicide application. Check one transect per 1-2 acres of field. At each transect, pick 25 heads without looking at the field. Mark the number of heads with FHB out of the total heads collected (FHB incidence). Fields with high levels of FHB incidence should be harvested with increased fan speeds to remove tombstones and grain stored separately from that harvested from cleaner fields. If possible, harvest fields early and dry to at least 15% moisture to prevent continued growth of the FHB fungus and potential mycotoxin production.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Field Crop Plant Pathologist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/12/17

Drying conditions and cool temperatures across the state over the next few days will keep our scab risk low in PA. Wheat flowering now is not very threatened by head scab. Check back early next week as temperatures rise, and we perhaps have humid conditions to see if risk is increasing. If you choose to spray your wheat, you can do so from the beginning of flowering up to about 5 days following the beginning of flowering. Remember, sprays applied PRIOR to flowering will NOT provide significant suppression of scab or toxin production. Caramba or Prosaro are effective on scab and give control of most leaf diseases and glume blotch. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. If these products are unavailable, Proline and Folicur (which together provide the same chemicals as Prosaro) may be tank mixed at a rate of 3 + 3 fl oz/A. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Do NOT use any strobilurin-containing fungicides at heading or beyond.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OH, 05/08/17

Head scab and vomitoxin become our biggest concerns at this time of the wheat season. For wheat flowering today, May 8, the risk of scab is low across most of the state (the map is green), but moderate in parts of the west (yellow areas close to the Indiana border). The risk is also moderate-high in the northeast corner if the state, but the wheat in that region is not yet flowering. Several fields across Southern and Central Ohio will reach anthesis during this week. The risk will likely remain low if it stays cold, in spite of the rains, but continue to keep your eyes on the weather and the scab forecasting and alert systems over the next few weeks, and be prepared to apply a fungicide (Prosaro or Caramba at full label-recommended rates) at flowering if the risk increases.

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 05/06/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The current focus of the prediction models is on wheat central KS, MO, IL, southern IN and OH as well as DE and MD where the wheat is approaching or already at the flowering growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The risk of disease is currently low for much of KS and MO; however, there is a moderate or high risk for some areas of IL, IN, DE and MD. Growers in this area should check with their local extension specialists or crop consultants for additional evaluations of disease risk.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 05/06/17

Wheat in the central portion of Kansas is now at flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to Fusarium head blight. The risk models currently indicate a low to moderate risk of disease for most of this area. The weather forecast indicates we are about to enter a period with higher temps and multiple days without rain. This should keep the risk of severe disease in central Kansas low for much of this critical period.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/06/17

Wheat crop is flowering or towards the end of flowering in Maryland. With high humidity and moderate temperatures, the risk for Fusarium Head Blight in the region continues to be high. The past week with high winds and rain may have made it difficult to spray fungicides for Fusarium head blight. Still there is time of around 4-5 days to spray appropriate products to reduce FHB and associated DON content. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application at 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre is recommended. For ground application, rear and forward facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal with 300 um droplet size.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 05/05/17

Nearly all of the wheat I saw this past week was along a line for about 100 miles west of Stillwater. Wheat around Stillwater is at the milk to soft dough stage. Wheat west of Stillwater ranged from full kernel to full kernel-milk. In this area, I saw both good and bad wheat. Much of the bad wheat I saw had been hit with wheat streak mosaic (WSM). To date, the Plant Disease and Insect Diagnostic Lab (Ms. Jen Olson, Director) has assessed about 82 wheat samples from 19 counties for Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), High plains virus (HPV), and Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV; PAV strain). These 19 counties are located west of Stillwater, and mostly are
west of I-35. Of these 82 samples, 56 were positive for WSMV, 11 were positive for HPV (all 11 co-infected with WSMV), and 42 were positive for BYDV. Four of the samples were positive for all three viruses. These figures indicate the severity of wheat viruses in Oklahoma this year. Reports from other states indicate this problem (mite transmitted viruses such as WSM) is just as severe up through the central plains. The cool, wet weather we have had can mitigate the effects of WSM and BYD, and help infected plants to continue to mature and finish. This would be especially true for plants/fields that were infected in the spring. However, yield and test weight will be affected especially if wheat was infected in the fall. For more information on mite-transmitted wheat viruses such as WSM, please see OSU Fact Sheet EPP-7328 (Wheat Streak Mosaic, High Plains Disease, and Triticum Mosaic: Three Virus Diseases of Wheat in Oklahoma) available at http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/HomePage

Regarding leaf and stripe rust, I have seen mostly leaf rust over the last week, but signs of stripe rust (both active and inactive) also can be observed. On susceptible varieties that were not sprayed, leaf rust was severe (≥60% flag leaf area showing pustules). In his nurseries at Lahoma in north-central OK, Dr. Brett Carver (OSU Wheat Breeder) is seeing some active and inactive stripe rust. Given our cool and wet weather, stripe rust appears to be re-activating. Dr. Carver also is seeing abundant and severe leaf rust.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/05/17

Over the next several days, our risk levels for FHB are dropping due to low temperatures. Much of PA is experiencing rains that would prevent spraying at this time anyway. Monitor closely as we go into next week to see if increasing temperatures and possible scattered rains increase our risk. Much of the barley in southern PA has headed and may be flowering or a bit past flowering now, but if you get a window to spray, even if you feel like you may be late, you can take it. The plants should be dry when you make your application, but a shower soon after application probably won’t wash much, if any, product off.

Wheat across the southern part of PA has begun to head out. In these areas, we can expect the first flowering around the middle of next week. Be prepared to spray a fungicide on fields that are at the beginning of flowering, up to about 5 days following the beginning of flowering. Remember, sprays applied PRIOR to flowering will NOT provide significant suppression of scab or toxin production. Caramba or Prosaro are effective on scab and give control of most leaf diseases and glume blotch. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. If these products are unavailable, Proline and Folicur (which together provide the same chemicals as Prosaro) may be tank mixed at a rate of 3 + 3 fl oz/A. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Do NOT use any strobilurin-containing fungicides at heading or beyond.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from DE, 05/05/17

Rains will continue to keep in elevated risk levels for FHB in varieties currently flowering (Kent Co Delaware and similar latitudes in Maryland), and slightly North. Growers with wheat flowering at this time may consider an application of a FHB fungicide (Caramba, Prosaro, Proline). Applications are most efficacious when applications occur from the start of flowering (50% of MAIN tillers with anthers extruded), through 6 days from the start of flowering. Efficacy is significantly reduced when applied outside of this window. Apply in 5 gal/A air and 15 gal/A by ground, 300-350 um droplet size, with nozzles at least angled forwards 30 degrees. Wheat not yet flowering is not at risk. Continue to check your wheat and this page for updates. For more information follow this link: http://extension.udel.edu/fieldcropdisease/2017/05/05/fungicide-applicat...

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Field Crop Plant Pathologist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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