FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from PA, 05/09/18

Wheat in lower Delaware is flowering, and barley in lower Pennsylvania is heading. If you farm in these areas, your scab infection risk is currently low, with the exception of the extreme southeast corner of Sussex County, DE. As temperatures warm and humidity increases across the region, it is likely our infection risk levels will increase. Please stay tuned to this risk tool since the crops are moving along, too. Be prepared to spray a fungicide on fields that are at the beginning of flowering, up to about 5 days following the beginning of flowering. Remember, sprays applied PRIOR to flowering will NOT provide significant suppression of scab or toxin production. Caramba or Prosaro are effective on scab and give control of most leaf diseases and glume blotch. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. If these products are unavailable, Proline and Folicur (which together provide the same chemicals as Prosaro) may be tank mixed at a rate of 3 + 3 fl oz/A. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Do NOT use any strobilurin-containing fungicides at heading or beyond.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/09/18

Wheat growers in Maryland have so far been fortunate this year for having low disease pressure from leaf rust, powdery mildew and even scab!! In the south (Eastern shore), wheat is flowering currently. With consistently warmer temperatures now, a few incidences of leaf diseases are being observed. Triazole fungicides: Prosaro/ Caramba/ Proline that are the scab fungicides should provide control against these as well. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be sprayed at this stage, as they may lead to DON accumulation in grains. Up in the north, flag leaves are emerging. No diseases being seen so far here as well. Growers should keep an eye on the FHB risk, as crop heads and flowers here in coming weeks.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/09/18

Storms are pushing through today (5.9.18) which may increase FHB risk in some areas. Early wheat has headed in some parts of the state and will likely start flowering by the end of the week. Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline can be applied from the start of flowering (50% of main tillers starting to flower) through about a week after this point without a loss in efficacy. Other active ingredients such as tebuconazole (Folicur etc) and propiconazole (Tilt etc) can be used but are not very efficacious for FHB. Do not apply products containing a strobilurim (QOI: FRAC group 11) to heads as these active ingredients have been demonstrated to increase vomitoxin in our replicated trials. Additional information can be found http://cropdisease.cropsciences.illinois.edu/

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 05/08/18

Wheat in southeast Kansas is currently at the heading and flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to infection by the Fusarium fungus. The risk maps currently indicate the risk of severe head blight, but given recent rains and humidity, I believe the risk may be greater than predicted. Wheat growers in Southeast portion of the state should consider protecting their crop with a fungicide. Prosaro, and Caramba are the best available fungicide options for FHB management. Folicur or generic tebuconazole fungicides would also be an option. Fungicides containing strobilurin active ingredients are not labeled for control of Fusarium head blight and should be avoided.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/08/18

Wheat in Missouri is behind in its normal development due to an unusually cool and dry April. This means that much of the wheat in the southern portion of the state is only at the heading stage while wheat in the northern part of the state is at the flag leaf to boot stage. Disease reports have overall been minimal due to the dry conditions. As the wheat approaches the flowering stage in the southern half of the state, FHB risk may increase with the forecast calling for precipitation in some areas. In the coming weeks, continue monitoring your FHB risk with the FHB risk assessment tool. Updates to follow as the crop begins to flower.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 05/08/18

Wheat crops that are flowering now in northeast NC are at moderate risk of scab. Much of the crop there has already flowered and is past danger, but some fields are flowering now or will flower in the next 2 weeks and are at risk. It will pay to spray if the variety is susceptible or moderately susceptible, and possibly if it is moderately resistant. Apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KY, 05/06/18

Wheat is beginning to flower in some fields in Kentucky. Although the Fusarium head blight risk prediction is currently low, additional rain in the forecast for later in the week may raise the risk. From multi-state university research trials, the products that have shown to be the most efficacious in managing Fusarium head blight and the associated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON; also known as vomitoxin) are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. The best application timing for management of Fusarium head blight and DON is when 50% of the plants in a field are beginning to flower (Feekes growth stage 10.5.1). University research has shown that fungicide applications within a few days after Feekes 10.5.1 (up to about 5 days), may provide similar control levels; however, it is important that preharvest intervals are observed and followed according to fungicide labels. Avoid applying fungicides that contain strobilurin active ingredients at late growth stages, as DON levels in grain may actually increase.

--Carl Bradley, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Kentucky

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 05/05/18

This past week I was at field days in southwestern Oklahoma (Apache and Altus), and northeastern Oklahoma (Afton). I didn’t see a single leaf or stripe rust pustule at any location. Wheat in southwestern OK ranged from at flowering to kernel formation, and typically was short (less than knee high). There were a few exceptions to this, namely a couple fields near Apache that had been planted on summer fallow ground. Wheat in these two fields looked good with some powdery mildew on the low to mid-canopy. There also was evidence of root rot (white heads) that was caused by Fusarium (Figure 1). This root rot was at a low incidence. By contrast, wheat in northeastern OK was at flowering and typically was over knee-high, thick, and with high yield potential. On many varieties, powdery mildew was heavy in the low and mid-canopy, and in a few instances also was present on the flag leaf (Figure 2). Besides powdery mildew, Septoria leaf blotch was heavy throughout the lower leaves of most varieties. In northeastern OK it appears that if a fungicide is going to be sprayed, that needs to be applied as soon as possible.

Based on my observations this past week and the recent report from Texas, it appears that rust pressure is low across Texas and Oklahoma. Hence, although there still is time for the rusts (especially leaf rust) to impact Oklahoma, it does not appear there will be an early season (during heading) high rust pressure as in most years. I still would be watchful and if you have a variety known to be susceptible to leaf rust with good yield potential (>about 30 bu/acre) I recommend considering a fungicide application. Be sure however, that your wheat has not matured past the allowed time (as indicated on the label) for the fungicide you apply. Additional information related to foliar fungicides can be found on the fungicide label and in OSU Current Reports 7668, Foliar Fungicides and Wheat Production in Oklahoma, which is available at: http://dasnr22.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-4987/CR-76....

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/04/18

This is the first FHB post of the 2018 season. Currently wheat in the state is at or near boot in more southern portions of the state and at or near flag leaf emergence heading from latitudes between Germantown and Champaign. Current forecasts call for a cool down in temperatures and some precipitation, which may slow crop development somewhat. Diseases in the crop have been low. Continue to check this page over the upcoming weeks as the crop approaches flowering for updates.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from TN, 05/03/18

Wheat continues to bloom in TN and in general there is low risk for FHB based on the model, scattered showers forecasted for the next day or two may increase risk on a local level. Consider your risk based on variety susceptibility, rain forecast, and field history (wheat after corn is at higher risk).

--Heather Young-Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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