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FHB Update from KS, 05/07/20

Submitted by Central Great … on 7, May 2020

Wheat in Eastern and Central Kansas is now at the heading and flowering stages of growth. These growth stages are most vulnerable to Fusarium head blight (head scab). The risk model currently indicates a moderate and high level of risk for many parts of these regions, and growers in these areas should be preparing to apply fungicides when conditions allow. The best available options include Prosaro, Caramba and Miravis Ace. Products containing Strobilurin active ingredients are not labeled for Fusarium and these products should be avoided in areas at moderate or high risk of head blight.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/05/20

Submitted by Mid West - Mid… on 5, May 2020

Early planted wheat has started to flower in the southern part of Illinois. Although conditions have been cool, persistent rains continue to elevate levels of FHB risk in flowering, highly susceptible wheat varieties. Suggested fungicide products for suppressing FHB and vomitoxin include Prosaro, Caramba, Miravis Ace, and Proline (if following with vegetables). Replicated research indicates all of the suggested products are most efficacious in suppressing vomitoxin when applied between FGS 10.5.1 through 5 days after 10.5.1. FGS 10.5.1 is defined as the point where 50% of the main tillers have started to flower in a field. Ensure that all label directions are being followed to ensure proper application and to ensure performance. Do not apply fungicides that contain a strobilurin (FRAC group 11) as these have been associated with enhanced DON in replicated research trials. Continue to monitor your fields and the FHB prediction center as you approach the most critical times for applying in season fungicides for FHB.

-- Nathan Kleczewski Ph.D., University of Illinois, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 04/30/20

Submitted by Mid West - Mid… on 30, Apr 2020

Wheat has begun flowering in the southeast region of the state and is moving full on into heading in the rest of the southern part of the state. Overall risk for FHB development remains low for most varieties that fall in the Moderately Susceptible and Moderately Resistant categories. As wheat starts to head out and flower in the rest of the state in the coming weeks, there are a few things to consider when determining whether a fungicide application will be warranted in your field. Consider the resistance level of the variety, the weather conditions present, and if wheat is flowering or approaching the flowering stage. If considering a fungicide application, the optimal time to apply a fungicide at or within 5 days of flowering. It is not recommended to apply a strobilurin containing fungicide as these fungicides can result in increases in mycotoxins in the grain. Always read and follow label instructions when applying fungicides.

-- Kaitlyn Bissonnette, University of Missouri, State Field Crop Plant Pathologist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/28/20

Submitted by National on 29, Apr 2020

Welcome to the FHB Prediction Center, 2020. The system has undergone some major revisions in the off-season and it may help to take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the new tools. The new interface focuses attention on the map-based risk of disease for the current date. The calendar icon that allows users to select dates of interest for your area. The date you select should correspond to times when your wheat is flowering. There is also a menu icon in the upper left corner that allows users to customize the model predictions for winter vs. spring wheat, and account for wheat varieties with different levels of genetic susceptibility to Fusarium head blight.

The focus of the prediction effort is currently on MO, TN, KY, Southern IL and VA where wheat is already at the heading and flowering stages of growth. The models estimate that the risk is currently low in these regions. Growers in these areas should consult with local advisors to determine other local factors that might also influence the risk of disease.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 04/28/20

Submitted by Mid West - Mid… on 28, Apr 2020

Illinois FHB update. Nathan Kleczewski Field Crop Plant Pathologist, UIUC

Some of the earlier planted wheat in the southern portions of the state may be heading by the end of this week. After heads have cleared the ligule, you generally have 3-5 days before the start of flowering (Feekes growth stage (FGS) 10.5.1.). Forecasts are not calling for significant rain over the next 10 days as of today (4/28), and the current risk for moderately susceptible wheat heading into flowering within the next 3-5 days should remain low. Continue to scout fields and monitor this site for updates as your wheat in these areas enter the critical period for FHB. If considering a fungicide, suggested products include Prosaro, Caramba, Miravis Ace, and Proline (if following with vegetables). Replicated research indicates all of the suggested products are most efficacious in suppressing DON when applied between FGS 10.5.1 through 5 days after 10.5.1. FGS 10.5.1 is defined as the point where 50% of the main tillers have started to flower.

--Nathan Kleczewski Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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