FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from MD, 05/30/18

Flowering is all finished across all counties of Maryland now, except for a few late planted fields in the northern part of MD that may still be flowering, and with the current high risks of FHB should be sprayed with Prosaro/Caramba. For most parts, wheat is now in the grain filling stage. With the showers that we had at flowering, there are high chances of substantial Fusarium Head Blight incidences this year. Consequently, tombstones (shriveled scabby kernels) and DON content are going to be a concern for the growers. To assess the incidence of FHB, you may randomly pick 20-25 heads of wheat per 1-2 acres and count the spikes having bleached spikelets. Fields with high incidence rates should be harvested separately from those with lower incidences. Harvesting from fields with high levels of FHB incidence should be done with higher fan speeds to remove lighter tombstone kernels. The farmers are advised to get the DON content analyzed in the grain before taking it to the market.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/27/18

Scab risk has increased significantly across much of Missouri over the past few days. In the southern half of the state, much of the wheat has already passed the flowering stage. However, later varieties in the southern part of the state and many of the varieties currently flowering in central and parts of northern Missouri are at risk for scab development. Consider applying triazole fungicide such as Prosaro, Caramba, or a generic tebuconazole if the wheat is at Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of the field is flowering) to reduce potential kernel damage and DON accumulation. In regards to varieties that may have already begun flowering within the last few days, a fungicide application up to 5 days after Feekes 10.5.1 also has been found to provide similar control. DO NOT apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide as it can result in increased DON accumulation.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/26/18

Scab risk is very slowly declining over the next few days across northern PA. Central and southern PA continue to be at high risk. Much of the wheat in these regions is about to begin flowering or has begun to do so. Time a fungicide application on fields that are at the beginning of flowering, up to about 5 days following the beginning of flowering. Remember, sprays applied PRIOR to flowering will NOT provide significant suppression of scab or toxin production. Caramba or Prosaro are effective on scab and give control of most leaf diseases and glume blotch. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. If these products are unavailable, Proline and Folicur (which together provide the same chemicals as Prosaro) may be tank mixed at a rate of 3 + 3 fl oz/A. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Do NOT use any strobilurin-containing fungicides at heading or beyond.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 05/25/18

Wheat in most areas of Kansas is now past the flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable for Fusarium infection. There may be some late planted fields in the north central and northwestern regions that are still flowering. Dry conditions appear to have most of the state at low risk. There is an area of high risk in southeast KS showing on the risk map today. This area has received more rain than most areas of the state, however, the wheat in these counties is already in the dough stages of development that are less vulnerable to infection.

Elsewhere in the central great plains, it appears that parts of Nebraska may be at risk for infection. Growers in this area should consult with local extension for advice on the need for fungicide applications.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 05/25/18

Welcome to the Fusarium head blight prediction center. This site provides daily estimates of disease risk for many of the areas of the US where head blight is a problem. The current focus of the prediction effort is on IL, IN, OH, PA, MA and NY this week. Wheat in these states are at growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection or will likely reach these stages in the next week. The current risk maps indicate a moderate to high risk of disease for some of these areas. Growers in the high risk areas should consult with local extension specialists or other advisors regarding the need for fungicide applications to protect the crop.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 05/24/18

Fusarium head blight for Virginia continues to be to high throughout the state due to recent wet, warm weather. Most of the wheat is past the flowering stage and no longer at risk, but later flowering wheat may still need a fungicide application. Triazole fungicides including Prosaro, Caramba, and Proline are recommended. For wheat that is past flowering, a fungicide application will not reduce FHB or DON contamination of the grain.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from WI, 05/24/18

The heavy moisture we have received over the last week, combined with high temperatures in the low-to-mid 80s F this week have pushed winter wheat growth stages. We have seen seen rapid stem elongation with flag leaves emerging in some fields in the southern and south central regions of Wisconsin. We continue to find wheat with little foliar disease. However, we are entering a critical time to make our first important fungicide decision related to protecting emerging flag leaves from foliar disease. Continue to scout. Weather has been conducive for some foliar diseases. However, wheat continues to remain "clean" then hold your fungicide application until anthesis.

Given the heat this week, I suspect that heads will be emerging for some varieties in the southern region over the next week or so, with anthesis to closely follow. The decision to apply fungicide will be critical at this time. Considering the wet weather and warm temperatures the "pump is primed" for Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab). The Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center currently has the FHB risk at medium to high in the south, south-central and eastern portions of the wheat belt. This situation needs to be monitored closely over the next couple of weeks as fields enter the anthesis growth stage. The weather outlook appears to be very humid, wet, and warm, which will only increase the risk of FHB.

A fungicide may be needed especially on susceptible cultivars to control FHB and reduce DON (vomitoxin) contamination. The fungicides Prosaro or Caramba have both performed well on FHB in Wisconsin. Timing of application of these products is critical. I would urge you to wait until anthesis has begun in your field before applying. We have observed poor control where application of these effective fungicides were made before anthesis. In fact, we have observed improved control of FHB and lower levels of DON in finished grain where fungicide application was delayed 4-5 days after the beginning of anthesis, compared to applications at the start of anthesis. Also, remember that application of fungicides should be made no later than 6-7 days after the start of anthesis. After this time, fungicide efficacy on FHB and DON control is much reduced.

Get out there and SCOUT, SCOUT, SCOUT and monitor the FHB Prediction Center!

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin-Madison

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MI, 05/24/18

Due to significant rainfall and warmer temperatures, the forecast map is indicating significant risk of head scab in southern MI where flowering will likely begin next week (week on May 27). The risk may dissipate to an extent by the time flowers appear. However, the threat will likely remain to some extent as current conditions are encouraging spore development and there is more wet weather in the forecast. In central Michigan, as of May 23, flag leaves are emerging. The risk of head scab and foliar diseases are below normal. Of course, this could change in a week’s time.

Growers are encouraged to reference "Managing Fusarium head blight in winter wheat" for additional information. Additionally, for those in southern Michigan where wet field conditions may preclude ground application, aerial application may need to be considered. See "Aerial application of fungicides for the suppression of Fusarium head blight in small grains".

Martin Nagelkirk & Martin Chilvers

--Martin Nagelkirk, Extension Educator, Michigan State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OH, 05/22/18

For those fields of wheat flowering and fields of barley head-out today (May 22), the risk for head scab is moderate in the northern-most counties and in the eastern portion of central Ohio. Persistent rainfall and high relative humidity over the last several days are the primary reasons for the moderate-risk prediction in those regions. But thanks to relatively cool temperatures, and dryer conditions in some cases, the risk remains low in most other areas of the state. However, this picture will likely change over the next few days as it warm-up, continues to rain, and more fields reach the flowering/heading growth stage. Continue to keep your eyes on the weather and the forecasting system, and be prepared to apply a fungicide. Wheat fields flowering and fields of barley still heading later this week and into the weekend (May 24-27) in the northern half of the state will likely be at the greatest risk for scab. Be prepared to protect them. Prosaro and Caramba are the two fungicides recommended for head scab management, and you will have a 4-5-day window from the day the crop reaches the critical growth stage (heading for barley and flowering for wheat) to make an application. Do remember to stay away from the strobilurins when the risk for scab is high as this group of fungicides has been linked to higher grain contamination with vomitoxin.

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/22/18

Wheat is finishing flowering in the southern half of the state but may be beginning or continuing to flower as you move northward. Scab risk has remained relatively low across much of Missouri in the past few weeks, but has increased in some isolated areas. If growing an FHB susceptible variety in one of these areas, a well-timed application of a triazole fungicide such as Prosaro, Caramba, or a generic tebuconazole at Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of the field flowering) could help to reduce potential kernel damage and DON accumulation. A fungicide application up to 5 days after Feekes 10.5.1 also has been found to provide similar control. DO NOT apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide as it can result in increased DON accumulation.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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