FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from KS, 04/14/17

Wheat in the southeast portion of Kansas is now at heading and flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to Fusarium head blight. The risk models currently indicate a low to moderate risk of disease for southeast Kansas. Wheat growers in this area should monitor the situation closely. The weather forecast indicates we are about to enter a period with frequent rainfall and extended periods of high relative humidity. These conditions could elevate the risk of disease again. Growers should be ready to respond with fungicides if needed. The fungicide products Prosaro and Caramba are best option for suppression of head blight. Most other fungicides are not labeled for this disease and provide very little protection.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from TN, 04/13/17

Many wheat fields have started flowering or will in the next week. Although risk is predicted as 'low' on the model, I believe blooming wheat fields in Tennessee where rain will occur are at risk for head scab infection and would benefit from a triazole fungicide application (fungicide group 3). Prosaro and Caramba are the top products to apply at bloom for head scab, although will not give 100% control, followed by Proline, Tebuconazole products (such as Folicur), and at the bottom is Propiconazole products (such as Tilt). See fungicide efficacy table at UTcrops.com for exact ratings and rates of products, as well as additional information. More information on the wheat disease situation in Tennessee can be found in the blog article: http://news.utcrops.com/2017/04/wheat-disease-update-april-13-2017/#more...

--Heather Young-Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/12/17

For wheat flowering now, scab risk is low across North Carolina. Risk is likely to remain low for the next 10-14 days or more, given the dry weather forecast. Meanwhile, stripe rust is reported in locations from the central Coastal Plain to Perquimans County in northeast NC. Wheat varieties rated resistant or moderately resistant to stripe rust should not be at risk, but varieties rated susceptible or moderately susceptible should be scouted. Do not delay applying a fungicide when stripe rust is found. It can develop much quicker than a leaf rust epidemic, and in a susceptible variety can do greater damage.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from AL, 04/11/17

The scab risk remains low for nearly the entire state of Alabama and dry weather patterns for the next week will keep that risk minimal. A moderate scab risk is in effect for Baldwin Co. Most of the wheat in that and surrounding counties already is past flowering, so there's little threat of further disease spread there. Rust has been found in wheat at several Alabama locations. Again, dry and warm weather patterns will limit further spread of that disease.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 04/11/17

Wheat in parts of Virginia is starting to head, but much of the crop is still at or close to flag leaf emergence. Stripe rust has been reported on the Eastern Shore, and susceptible varieties such as Shirley should be scouted for this disease. Stripe rust can spread very rapidly and a preventative fungicide may be needed to protect the wheat crop. More information on stripe rust and other wheat diseases can be found on the Virginia Ag Pest and Crop Advisory Blog (http://blogs.ext.vt.edu/ag-pest-advisory). Wheat that is beginning to head this week will start flowering in a week or two. Currently, Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) risk is low in most parts of the state with a few moderate to high risk areas along the Eastern Shore. As the wheat crop starts to flower, it is important to monitor the FHB risk and apply fungicides as needed. Updates on FHB risk and management recommendations will be provided here throughout the period of flowering for the Virginia wheat crop.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from DE, 04/07/17

The 2017 wheat season is underway in DE and MD. Wheat in the southern parts of the states is just past jointing, and most of the wheat in northern areas has just entered the jointing phase. It will be roughly two weeks before our fields reach the flag leaf stage, and likely three weeks or more after that before we reach the flowering phase, when we need to pay more attention to the forecast for FHB. I would like to mention that STRIPE RUST is very active in the eastern shore of Virginia, and I expect that given current forecasts and weather, it will start to make an appearance in susceptible varieties in southern portions of DE and potentially in MD over the next two weeks. For more information and management information, copy and paste this link into your browser: http://extension.udel.edu/fieldcropdisease/2017/03/30/stripe-rust-presen...

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Field Crop Plant Pathologist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 04/05/17

Yesterday (04-April) wheat in my foliar fungicide trial at the Plant Pathology Farm located just west of Stillwater appeared to be at GS 10 to 10.1 (head in the boot to awns just emerging from the boot). Wheat in southwestern, south-central, and central OK ranges from almost fully headed to heads emerging depending on management (primarily whether or not it was grazed). Leaf rust is present around the state, but mostly at low to moderate levels. I have not seen any stripe rust, but active stripe rust was reported in central OK, and dormant (telial stage) stripe rust was reported in southwestern OK. Powdery mildew is heavy in susceptible wheat that has thick/heavy foliage.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from LA, 04/05/17

Apologies for a late Louisiana Update: Acreage in Louisiana is very low this year, probably less than 40K. Wheat at this point ranges from flag leaf to dough stage, and scab is showing up in the few producer fields that we have. Uneven heading due to drought at planting, uneven tillage, and some vernalization issues have made it very difficult to effectively time fungicide applications. Wheat flowering in the past week has been at high risk to scab because of environmental conditions. High winds associated with thunderstorms and tornadoes has caused significant lodging issues confounding production.

--Trey Price, Extension Plant Pathologist, Louisiana State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/05/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The current focus of the prediction models is on the Mid. South where the wheat is approaching or already at the flowering growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection. Growers in this area should check with their local extension specialists or crop consultants for additional evaluations of disease risk. The risk tool also indicates a high level of risk for much of KS, MO, IL, IN and parts of OH. Fortunately, the wheat in most of these areas is not at vulnerable growth stages yet and the risk of disease is lower than currently suggested by the model.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 04/05/17

The FHB forecasting site indicates that the risk of disease is KS is moderate or high in many areas of the state. Fortunately, the most fields are not at the growth stages that are vulnerable to the disease. A few early planted fields may be at risk. The crop will not reach the susceptible stages for another 7 to 10 days in the Southeast corner of the state. Other areas of the state are probably more than two weeks out.

Recent rainfall is important because it favors the development of the Fusarium fungus and increases the chances that it will reproduce and release spores when the crop does reach the critical growth stages. Additional periods of high RH will be needed at that time for the disease to develop.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

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