FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from NC, 04/23/18

For wheat flowering now, scab risk is low across North Carolina due to recent dry weather. Rain predicted for April 23-28 will make conditions more conducive to scab for wheat flowering in the coming 10 days. However, considering the amount of moisture predicted, risk for wheat flowering later this week and next week will likely remain low in most of North Carolina, with the likely exception being the Tidewater area. If your wheat is flowering in the next 2 weeks, monitor scab risk closely, especially if you have susceptible varieties.

Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. For scab, the most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 04/20/18

Wheat in southern Maryland is either at jointing or booting stage, and should be heading out in a week or so. Even with the recent showers, the FHB risk is currently predicted to be low because of the cold temperatures so far. However, the temperatures are going to increase by next week, so growers are advised to keep an eye on the FHB risk forecasts. Up in the north in Frederick, Harford and nearby counties, plants are starting to joint, and are not at a stage prone for FHB.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from AL, 04/20/18

While moisture levels remain adequate due to periodic heavy showers, the following fronts have brought dry and unusually cool weather patterns, which are not conductive to foliar disease development. Overall, scab threat across Alabama is low and is not expected to change until the week of April 22 when several days of rain are forecast. Wheat in South and probably Central AL is past flowering and is not vulnerable to scab. Wheat in North AL has not yet flowered or is in full flower and may be vulnerable to scab early next week. Activity of other foliar diseases in North AL is very low with only some Septoria leaf spot and glume blotch being seen in breeding line trials at the Tennessee Valley Research and Extension Center. Overall, it's a low disease year in Alabama wheat.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 04/19/18

Currently the wheat crop in Virginia is near flag leaf emergence, and flowering will start within a couple of weeks. As flowering begins, be sure to monitor the FHB risk in your area. Currently, most of Virginia has low risk for FHB infection. The exception is the Eastern Shore where risk is moderate to high in many areas, especially on susceptible varieties such as Shirley.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/16/18

Wheat scab risk is moderate to high for wheat flowering now in coastal NC counties. These include south Columbus, Carteret, Pamlico, east Craven, southeast Beaufort. Wheat is likely at earlier growth stages in coastal counties north of those. Risk remains low for the Coastal Plain and other regions of the state. If risk in your area is moderate to high and wheat is flowering, apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 04/13/18

Wheat in central Oklahoma was reported at growth stages 8-9 (flag leaf emerging to flag leaf fully emerged). In northern Oklahoma, wheat was extremely variable with growth stages from 2-8 (tillering to flag leaf emerging) being reported. Powdery mildew continued to be the primary wheat foliar disease this past week in Oklahoma. Around Stillwater, I have seen powdery mildew on the lower and mid-leaves with severities reaching 90% on the lower leaves. A preponderance of powdery mildew on lower to mid leaves also was indicated across Oklahoma by reporting from Extension Educators. There was one report of stripe rust in south central Oklahoma from near Ardmore, OK. This report indicated both active stripe rust and the dormant (telial) spore stage of stripe rust. The only other observation this week has been “spots” of barley yellow dwarf as reported last week. However, after the recent freeze events, these barley yellow dwarf “spots” are more difficult to discern because there is widespread burning of leaf tips from the freeze, which has a masking effect.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 04/12/18

This is the first FHB update for Virginia in 2018. Currently the wheat crop is in the jointing stages, and we are several weeks away from flowering. Currently the risk is low for most areas of the state except for the Eastern Shore. These conditions may change as the wheat crop approaches flowering, so be sure to continue monitoring the risk tool. Weekly updates will be provided until wheat in the state has completed flowering.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/11/18

Welcome to the Fusarium head blight prediction center. This site provides daily estimates of disease risk for many of the areas of the US where head blight is a problem. The current focus of the prediction effort is on southern states including LA, MS, AL and GA. Wheat in northern portions of these states will reach growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection in the next 7 -10 days. Some parts of this region were at moderate risk this past week, but the risk has diminished over the last few days. You can see more detail about an area by selecting a state from the menu to the left of the map.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/11/18

This is the first North Carolina small grain scab risk commentary for the 2018 scab monitoring season. In most of NC, wheat is still 2-6 weeks from the period when Fusarium infects heads, which is flowering. In the southern part of the Coastal Plain, several wheat varieties have headed and will flower soon. Barley will soon head in the Coastal Plain. Currently, scab risk is low in all the wheat- and barley-growing areas of NC, with the exception of some coastal areas. The forecast holds only a little rain, which means risk will remain low for the next 10-14 days. There is no need to treat for scab when risk is low. Updates will be provided for the next approx. 6 weeks.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from AL, 04/11/18

Scab risk for Baldwin and Mobile Counties is high as compared with the low risk for scab development across the remainder of Alabama. Wheat is flowering across Southwest Alabama, so producers should make a fungicide application before the next rain event scheduled for this coming weekend. A low level of rust activity along with a low to moderate level of Septoria glume blotch was also noted in Baldwin Co. With the exception of trace levels of powdery mildew and Septoria leaf spot, disease activity at two North Alabama locations was low on wheat showing the flag leaf but no seed heads.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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