FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from NC, 04/22/19

Wheat flowering today is at medium to high scab risk in scattered but widespread areas of the central NC Tidewater zone. Late-planted fields may not be near flowering yet, but those planted on time may be. Apply fungicide at early flowering if risk is high then. If necessary, spraying up to 6-7 days after early flowering should be nearly as effective. Fungicides are significantly less effective against scab when applied prior to flowering. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. The most effective products for scab are Caramba, Prosaro, Miravis Ace, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 04/22/19

Most of the wheat crop in Virginia is currently between flag leaf emergence and heading with some wheat close to the flowering stage. As wheat reaches the flowering stage, it is susceptible to infection with FHB, and this is the critical stage for making fungicide applications. Currently, the risk for FHB infection is low throughout Virginia. In addition, the 3-day forecast indicates risk will remain low. Recommended fungicides for control of FHB and DON contamination include Caramba, Prosaro, and Miravis Ace, and the optimum application timing is early flowering. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after the flag leaf stage since this has the potential to increase DON concentrations in the grain.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 04/22/19

Wheat and barley crops now range from tillering to Feekes 7 in most fields of Pennsylvania. Currently, PA is at a “low” risk of scab development because it has been too cool, and now we are entering a period of relative dryness. While the wheat in PA is too young to worry about scab right now, those of you wishing to apply a fungicide along with your growth regulator spray or any topdressing should scout for powdery mildew before doing so. We generally recommend only spraying for this disease if 5-10% of the fully expanded upper leaves are infected, and because it has been rather dry, your wheat may not meet this threshold. Scout your most densely planted areas first—these are the most likely to show signs of powdery mildew. As the crop approaches heading, visit wheatscab.psu.edu to use the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. This forecasting tool tends to function best on the free Mozilla Firefox browser. If you are experiencing trouble with the forecast, visit in late morning when the tool fully updates. You can also sign up to have this commentary delivered to you via text or e-mail at scabusa.org/fhb_alerts .

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 04/21/19

Welcome to the FHB risk assessment for Maryland. This is our first commentary for this season, and they will be posted regularly throughout the small grain season from here on. Hopefully, you selected a resistant wheat variety for your planting this year after referring to the University of Maryland’s FHB evaluation of wheat varieties (https://psla.umd.edu/extension/extension-project-pages/small-grains-mary...). A good start goes a long way in managing FHB. Wheat in the Eastern shore of Maryland is either at jointing or booting stage and should be heading out in a week or so. Barley, however, is at heading or will be soon heading in this part of the state. It is important to note that the correct stage for spraying fungicides on wheat is at flowering (when the yellow anthers start to show on the heads), whereas on barley it is at heading (when the heads emerge out of the boots). Even with some intermittent showers, the FHB risk is currently predicted to be low across the state. However, with the rain forecast for this week, the risk may soon escalate. The right fungicides for FHB are Prosaro, Miravis-Ace or Caramba at the right stage of the crop. Fungicides containing strobilurin should not be applied for control of FHB, as in multiple university research trials, strobilurin fungicides have been shown to increase DON levels in grain. Up in the north in Frederick, Harford and nearby counties, wheat plants are starting to joint, and are not at a stage prone for FHB.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 04/19/19

This past week I had phone conversations with two individuals from southwestern OK. Both indicated they are starting to see a bit more rust (primarily leaf rust) across southwestern OK, and with wheat approaching heading they are considering making arrangements to spray.

Moving into central OK, David Nowlin (Extn. Educator; Caddo County in central Oklahoma) reported that on Monday, April 15th when he was at the variety trial near Apache, OK, many of the varieties were just starting to head. He found no rust at the variety trial, but continues to see tan spot/septoria. He also indicated the trial had been sprayed for aphids, so there were no aphids.

Also early this past week, Robert Calhoun (Senior Agriculturalist, Plant & Soil Sciences, OkSU) found stripe rust at the Experiment Station located in north-central OK near Lahoma. Robert indicated the incidence of stripe rust was extremely low. Today (Friday, 19-Apr) I looked at wheat west of Stillwater to Hennessey (about 50 miles) and then north to Waukomis (about 20 miles). Wheat along this route and around Stillwater is between growth stages 9-10 (flag leaf fully emerged to boot stage). I didn’t see rust anywhere I stopped. I did see some tan spot in one field that had obvious wheat residue, and moderate powdery mildew on lower leaves in one field. By far the most common “find” was aphids – mostly bird cherry-oat, but also some greenbug. I observed some associated spots that I suspect are barley yellow dwarf, but these “spots” were fairly scattered and not numerous. Brian Olson (Senior Agriculturalist; OkSU) spent Friday morning spraying at the station near Lahoma and indicated he did not find any rust and that heads were not yet in the boot.

In summary, foliar diseases are still at low incidence across Oklahoma but there is the indication that leaf rust is increasing across southern OK. Given the present and short-term forecast for temperature and moisture, I expect leaf rust to increase. These conditions also are favorable for stripe rust and powdery mildew, but the seeming sparseness of these two foliar diseases at this point in time indicates that in a typical year we are more at risk from leaf rust than we are from stripe rust or powdery mildew.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from GA, 04/18/19

Wheat scab risk is high in most of the state. It’s especially sensitive timing for mid Georgia and the Piedmont area. If wheat is flowering, apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Labeled fungicides include Caramba, Prosaro, Proline, Folicur, Tilt, and Miravis Ace. The most effective products are Prosaro, Caramba, Proline and Miravis Ace (as per NCERA 184 wheat fungicide table). Avoid applying a strobilurin-containing fungicide.

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 04/15/19

Wheat in southeastern and south-central Kansas is at flag leaf emergence and will reach the growth stages critical for Fusarium in roughly 2 weeks. We will be monitoring for the risk of disease and provide more updates soon.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/15/19

Wheat in AR, TN and NC should be approaching the critical stages of growth over the next 7 to 10 days. There may also be some areas of northern LA, MS and AL that are still at vulnerable growth stages. At this point, the risk of severe disease is low or moderate, in most of these areas. There is a region of southern MS, AL and GA that appears to be a moderate or high risk, however, wheat in this area is likely past the most vulnerable growth stages.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/15/19

Pockets of medium to high scab risk for wheat flowering this week have opened up in southeast NC, specifically Onslow, Pender, and adjacent counties. Late-planted fields are likely not near flowering yet, but those planted on time may be. Fungicides are significantly less effective when applied prior to flowering. Apply fungicide at early flowering. If necessary, up to 7 days later should be almost as effective. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, Miravis Ace, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from AL, 04/14/19

So far this spring, overall disease activity in wheat across much of Alabama has been light. Neither leaf or yellow rust has been observed in any of the cultivar trials located around the state, while light Septoria leaf spot was diagnosed in wheat cultivar screening trials in North AL. Scab risk is high over SW AL but medium to low across the rest of the state. Most likely, much of the wheat in that area has already flowers and is at low risk for scab development. Wheat in Central and North AL is flowering now.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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