FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from MN, 06/30/17

In MN temperatures have fluctuated greatly within the past few weeks. Despite this, the overall spring wheat crop looks to be doing well in terms of disease. In many areas spray applications for FHB are being contemplated at this time. The risk model is trending high risk in the Northwestern part of the state for super susceptible varieties e.g. Mayville. The two day forecasting for moderately resistant varieties is low to moderate risk . Despite this, many areas are experiencing periods of high relative humidity after storm events. Premature discolouration of awns, indicating FHB infection, is prevalent in these areas. Therefore, use of fungicide to control FHB for moderately resistant varieties should also be considered. Applications should be made at early flowering (Feekes 10.5.1). If not possible at this time, applications up to five days post-flowering have been shown to have some efficacy. Always check current labels for pre-harvest interval and other use restrictions.

--Madeleine Smith, Plant Pathologist, University of Minnesota

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 06/29/17

Welcome to the Fusarium head blight predictions center. The focus of the prediction effort is currently on the norther hard red spring wheat in ND, MN and SD where the wheat crop is at or approaching the flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to fusarium head blight. Be sure to select state you are most interested in from the menu to the left of the risk map. This will also you to zoom in to see more details of the map and display commentary from local wheat specialists.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 06/28/17

The small grain crop has headed and/or flowered in western ND and some of the small grain crop is starting to head and flower in the northern tier of the state. The greatest amount of scab risk for headed small grains is in northeast ND (Towner Co. and Cavalier Co.). Rain and thunderstorms occurred yesterday and more rain is forecasted in the upcoming days. Also, the chance of evening and morning dew will increase in the upcoming days. Therefore, scab risk may increase in portions of the state with prolonged and/or frequent periods of moisture in the past 15 days.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/26/17

Spring wheat in SD is now at flowering. However, it has been dry and currently temperatures are low. These conditions do not favor scab development, the reason why the FHB risk tool is showing low risk for FHB throughout SD. For spring wheat just starting to head, there is a need to keep checking on this FHB risk tool until wheat is done flowering. For moderate to high risk for FHB, plan a triazole fungicide at the flowering growth stage to manage FHB.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 06/20/17

Welcome to the Fusarium head blight predictions center. The focus of the prediction effort is currently on the norther hard red spring wheat in ND, MN and SD where the wheat crop is at or approaching the flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to fusarium head blight.. Be sure to select state you are most interested in from the menu to the left of the risk map. This will also you to zoom in to see more details of the map and read commentary from local disease specialists.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 06/20/17

Spring wheat along I-94 is heading with some of the crop flowering. Spring wheat in the northern tier of the state is in late-tillering to flag leaf stage. A moderate to high scab risk exists for flowering in northeast ND (Cavalier, Towner and Rolette County) and this risk will likely persist for several days. Other areas of the state that received significant rainfall in the past seven days will likely see an elevated scab risk in the upcoming days. Continue to monitor the growth stage of the small grain crop.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 06/13/17

Winter wheat is flowering and some of the earliest planted spring wheat is starting to head. Fusarium head blight risk for the state is low and is likely attributed to the dry weather most of the state has been experiencing. In the past few days, several rain events have occurred in the state and more are projected in the upcoming days. If areas of the state have several days of prolonged moisture and high humidity, scab risk will likely increase. Continue to monitor the growth stage in wheat and use the model to estimate scab risk.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/13/17

Some of the winter wheat in SD is past flowering growth stage. This means the risk for Fusarium head blight is low. Moreover, current FHB prediction tool shows low risk for the entire state. This is mainly due to the dry weather we have had the past few weeks. Although rains came through the last two days, we need to accumulate several days of favorable weather for the FHB risk to change. Late planted winter wheat that has not flowered yet may still be at risk. Keep watching the weather and the FHB prediction tool until wheat is done flowering.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/05/17

Winter wheat in SD has started flowering. This is the critical stage when Fusarium head blight (FHB) starts to develop. Currently, the FHB prediction tool shows low risk for FHB across the entire state. This is due to the dry conditions we are experiencing. Continue to watch the weather and check on this prediction tool to assess the need for a triazole fungicide until wheat is done flowering.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from WI, 06/02/17

Many winter wheat varieties in Wisconsin are headed out and at, or will be at, anthesis (flowering) this weekend. Currently, the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center is ranking much of the primary winter wheat growing area of Wisconsin at medium risk with many pockets of high risk for FHB on susceptible varieties. Warm temperatures and the threat of rain this weekend will make conditions further favorable for FHB. In addition, stripe rust is quickly increasing in many fields on susceptible varieties. I have observed 20% stripe rust severity on flag leaves in several fields with high incidence across those fields. The primary fungicides for control of FHB are Caramba and Prosaro. These same products are rated as “excellent” on stripe rust. I would urge you to verify anthesis has begun in your field before applying either product. We have observed poor control of FHB where application of these effective fungicides was made before anthesis. In fact, we have observed improved control of FHB and lower levels of DON in finished grain where fungicide application was delayed 4-5 days after the beginning of anthesis, compared to applications at the start of anthesis. Also, remember that application of fungicides should be made no later than 6-7 days after the start of anthesis. After this time, fungicide efficacy on FHB is much reduced. Finally, DO NOT use any fungicide products that contain a strobilurin fungicide after the "boot" stage in wheat. Some studies have demonstrated that using strobilurin fungicides at, or after heading, can result in increased vomitoxin (DON) levels in finished grain. Get out there and SCOUT, SCOUT, SCOUT!

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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