FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from MD, 05/01/17

Wheat is currently flowering in Maryland, and this is the most vulnerable stage of Fusarium infection. With the recent showers that we have had, the Fusarium Head Blight risk in the state is very high. Growers are advised to apply fungicides now to reduce the damage. Applications past the stage of flowering will not be of any help. Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline are the most effective fungicides against FHB. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide. Aerial application at a rate of 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre with 300-350 um droplet size and nozzles angled down 30 to 45 degrees from horizontal is recommended.

--Nidhi Rawat, Plant Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KY, 05/01/17

Much of the wheat in Kentucky is now past the stage of applying a foliar fungicide for protection against Fusarium head blight. However, some late-planted fields and some late-maturing varieties may be at the beginning flowering stage now. Based on the rainfall that has occurred over the last several days, wheat that is flowering in Kentucky is at a high risk for Fusarium head blight.

--Carl Bradley, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Kentucky

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from DE, 05/01/17

Rain has pushed a large portion of the region into a severe level of risk for FHB if that wheat is currently flowering. Most of the wheat in S Delaware and S Maryland likely started to flower late last week and is at elevated risk for FHB, especially if a suceptible variety was planted. Growers with wheat flowering at this time are advised to make an application of a FHB fungicide (Caramba, Prosaro, Proline). Applications are most efficacious when applications occur from the start of flowering, through p days from the start of flowering. Apply in 5 gal/A air and 15 gal/A by ground, 300-350 um droplet size, with nozzles at least angled forwards 30 degrees. Wheat not yet flowering is not at risk. Continue to check your wheat and this page for updates.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Field Crop Plant Pathologist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 04/27/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Risk Assessment Tool for 2016! If you are new to this risk tool or haven’t used it in a while, please click and read the “User Guide” on the left hand side of your screen. The first paragraph has the main steps to get you started with the model. Our small grains in PA got head start on growth due to warm conditions this spring. If you intend to protect your barley from Fusarium head blight (a.k.a. head scab), be prepared to spray a triazole fungicide in the next few days. See my article here for details: http://extension.psu.edu/plants/crops/news/2017/04 Right now the wheat in the lower part of the state is anywhere between Feekes 7 and 8. I’ll update this commentary with more frequency as we approach heading in PA. If you’d like to receive updates directly to your e-mail or via text, please sign up at http://scabusa.org/fhb_alerts.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 04/26/17

Due to the recent rain, scab risk is increasing in portions of Virginia, especially on the Eastern Shore and coastal areas. Fungicides targeting scab should be applied within 5-6 days of flowering (50% of main tillers starting to flower from the center of the head). Do NOT apply a strobilurin or fungicide pre-mix containing a strobilurin after flag leaf emergence (Feekes 9) since this can increase DON contamination in the grain. Prosaro, Caramba, and Proline are the most effective products for reducing scab and DON contamination. These fungicides will also control foliar diseases such as leaf blotch, stripe and leaf rust, and powdery mildew.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 04/25/17

Wheat in Maryland is anywhere from booting to flowering. Currently, the overall risk for Fusarium Head blight is predicted to be low, because of the preceding dry weeks. Growers with late planted wheat should keep a close watch on the weather in the weeks to come, and should be prepared to apply a fungicide if weather conditions persist to be humid. The fungicides most effective against FHB and DON contamination are Prosaro, Caramba, and Proline are the most effective and these fungicides will also control against foliar diseases, of which stripe rust has been a concern this season. Date: 4/22/16

--Nidhi Rawat, Plant Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 04/25/17

Wheat in the southeast and south central portion of Kansas is now at flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to Fusarium head blight. The risk models currently indicate a low to moderate risk of disease for southeast and south central Kansas. Wheat growers in this area should monitor the situation closely. The weather forecast indicates we are about to enter a period with frequent rainfall and extended periods of high relative humidity. These conditions could elevate the risk of disease again. Growers should be ready to respond with fungicides if needed. The fungicide products Prosaro and Caramba are best option for suppression of head blight. Most other fungicides are not labeled for this disease and provide very little protection.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from DE, 04/25/17

Cool, wet weather has persisted and is forecast through 4/28. Wheat is likely to start flowering this week in varieties that started to head out at the end of last week in southern portions of MD and DE. Applications of Prosaro, Proline, and Caramba can be made anywhere from the start of flowering (roughly 50% of main tillers flowering in the field) to 5-6 days afterwards without a loss of efficacy. Applicators should include 0.125% NIS and apply at least 2 hours before rain for maximum effectiveness. Aerial applications should be made at 5 gal/A and at least 15 gal/A if applying by ground. Target 300-350 um droplet size. Nozzles angled forward 30 degrees will improve coverage of the head. I expect flowering will continue up the shore over the next 10-14 days. Growers should continually scout fields and check this page for updates.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Field Crop Plant Pathologist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/25/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The current focus of the prediction models is on wheat in western KY, MO, IL, IN and parts of southern KS where the wheat is approaching or already at the flowering growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The risk of disease is currently low for much of this area, but conditions may change rapidly if we enter a period of rainy, humid weather. Growers in this area should check with their local extension specialists or crop consultants for additional evaluations of disease risk.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/25/17

Wheat crops that are flowering now in northern NC may be at significant risk of scab, especially if the variety is susceptible or moderately susceptible. This includes Dare County, and north of the Albemarle Sound (Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden), as well as in the northern Piedmont (Surry, Stokes, Yadkin, Forsyth). Apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal. Average reported crop maturity: 80-90% of the crop in the Washington-Tyrrell-Beaufort-Hyde region is late in the flowering process, and should be mostly past vulnerability. North of the Albemarle: 50-60% of the crop is in the heading/flowering process, and is at greater risk, especially if the wheat variety is susceptible. Information on variety resistance is at https://smallgrains.ces.ncsu.edu/smallgrains-disease-identification-mana... and on ground and aerial fungicide application at https://smallgrains.ces.ncsu.edu/smallgrains-head-scab/.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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