FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from US, 09/12/18

Thanks for your interest in the Fusarium head blight prediction center. The wheat growing season has ended in most areas of the US and the Fusarium head blight prediction center will no longer be generating new risk maps. The maps for the 2018 growing season will be available for your review during the next few months. The system is scheduled to resume activity in February-March of 2019. We hope to see you then.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 07/31/18

Much of the US wheat crop should be beyond the growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium head blight. The moderate gray color of the map suggests that the crop is already mature and being harvested in much of the country. Growers in the far northern regions of ND and MN may have some late maturing fields to monitor. Therefore, the risk tool will continue to run until approximately Aug 15th.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 07/20/18

Spring wheat is entering late stages of dough development in several areas of the state, however there are some late-planted fields that have started to flower. The greatest amount of scab risk for susceptible and moderately susceptible varieties is in the eastern third of North Dakota. Continue to monitor the growth stage in late planted spring wheat and durum and make a fungicide application at early-flowering.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 07/16/18

Most of the spring wheat is past flowering but for late planted or late maturing spring wheat varieties, flowering may still be going on. These fields are at risk for Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab). The FHB prediction tool is showing moderate to high risk for FHB mainly for the eastern-most counties and a few southeast areas. Spring wheat in these areas that is at flowering should be protected from FHB using a triazole (FRAC group 3) fungicide. For fields that were not treated due to wet conditions, a fungicide can still be applied within 6 days post flowering, however, the most efficacious timing for FHB management is when 50% of the wheat plants are at flowering.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 07/05/18

Spring wheat and durum growth stages vary across the state. Some fields are entering early dough development, while later planted fields are in the boot stage. For susceptible varieties that are entering flowering stages, several pockets of moderate to high risk exist in the state. Risk will likely increase on the eastern half of North Dakota in the next few days. Continue to monitor the growth stage of fields that are entering the flowering stages of development and apply an effective triazole (FRAC 3) fungicide when needed.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 07/05/18

The risk for Fusarium head blight (FHB, scab) remains high for the most of the eastern half of the state and some parts of north and southwest SD. Spring wheat that is at flowering or just done flowering may benefit from a triazole fungicide application. Although the most effective timing is at flowering (50% of the plants flowering), rainy weather conditions may prevent fungicide spraying at this growth stage. Research shows that there is still protection from FHB and DON within 6 days after flowering, therefore a fungicide can still be applied within this window.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MN, 07/03/18

FHB has been observed in winter wheat in the southern portion of the state. Many areas have had high rainfall with frequent storm activity. This is contributing to high relative humidity and high risk of FHB as well as other fungal diseases in these areas. The risk map is currently trending high risk for susceptible and moderately susceptible spring wheat varieties across the southern half of the state with some high risk areas also located in the North central area of the state. Awn infections have been observed in commercial fields of spring wheat in the Northwest of the state. Treatment with fungicide should be considered when the majority of spikes have reached early flowering. However, fungicide applications made 4- 7 days after first flowering can still have some efficacy , if conditions have made spraying at early flowering impossible. However, remember to check labels for current use restrictions and pre-harvest intervals which must not be exceeded.

--Madeleine Smith, Plant Pathologist, University of Minnesota

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 07/02/18

Welcome to the Fusarium head blight prediction center. This site provides daily estimates of disease risk for many of the areas of the US where head blight is a problem. The current focus of the prediction effort is on ND, SD and MN this week. Wheat in these states are at growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection or will likely reach these stages in the next week. The current risk maps indicate a moderate to high risk of disease for some of these areas. Growers in the high-risk areas should consult with local extension specialists or other advisors regarding the need for fungicide applications to protect the crop.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/27/18

Spring wheat is at heading and some of the fields are at flowering growth stage. Current weather conditions are conducive for Fusarium head blight or scab to develop for the majority of the state. The FHB prediction tool is a showing high risk for FHB in susceptible cultivars for more than 1/2 of the state. A triazole fungicide applied at flowering is advisable to protect wheat from FHB and DON.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 06/27/18

Scab risk has increased for susceptible varieties that are headed or are in the flowering stages of development. Currently, there are several areas of moderate to high risk across much of the state. Scab risk for moderately susceptible varieties is lower, however a pocket of moderate risk exists in southwest North Dakota. I am expecting scab risk in the state to maintain or even get higher in the next few days. Several factors that will contribute to a higher risk include wheat planted on corn residue, rain, prolonged dew periods (into the afternoon hours), and fog. Continue to monitor the growth stage in the field, record field conditions, and apply a timely fungicide.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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