FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from NY, 06/03/20

The Fusarium Risk Assessment Map (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/ ) today indicates a moderate to high risk of Fusarium head blight (FHB) for some areas of New York. Winter wheat has begun flowering (anthesis) in New York and this is critical timing for fungicide application to suppress FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin accumulation in grain. The DMI (FRAC Group 3) containing fungicides Caramba, Prosaro, or Miravis Ace (latter includes a FRAC Group 7 fungicide) are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and DON contamination when applied at flowering (emergence of yellow anthers on heads). A flowering application of these fungicide products should be based on Fusarium head blight (FHB) risk as well as the risks of powdery mildew, rusts, and fungal leaf blotches in the upper canopy based on scouting of individual fields. There is an application window of approximately 7 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB and DON suppression can be expected. Stagonospora nodorum blotch, Septoria tritici blotch, and powdery mildew have been observed. The first occurrence of stripe rust this season was confirmed this week in Seneca Co. (https://wheat.agpestmonitor.org/stripe-rust/ ), and widespread scouting for stripe rust is warranted now! The fungicides recommended for FHB suppression are effective in protecting flag leaves against stripe rust. Fungicide products containing QoI (FRAC Group 11) fungicides should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/ ) and your local weather forecast frequently over the next week.

Most winter malting barley in New York is now past flowering stages and the window for effective fungicide application. Winter barley should be monitored over the next few weeks for symptoms and signs of FHB and other diseases. Scald and low levels of barley leaf rust, spot blotch, and powdery mildew have been observed. Spring malting barley varies in growth stage according to planting date but some fields in New York are now at jointing stages.

-- Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from WI, 06/02/20

Winter wheat in Wisconsin is moving through growth stages very rapidly over the past week due to ample moisture and heat. I have visited several fields this week with heads emerging or almost completely emerged. Anthesis (flowering) will begin in many winter wheat fields this week, if it hasn’t already started. With the start of anthesis comes the critical time to consider a fungicide application for Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab). The Fusarium Risk Tool is showing very favorable conditions for the major wheat producing areas of Wisconsin, for susceptible varieties (Fig. 1). Risk is also medium-to-high in these zones for moderately susceptible varieties. Given the heat and high humidity with the multiple chances of rain predicted, a fungicide application may be warranted at this time in your winter wheat fields, especially if you have susceptible varieties. To read the rest of the update click this link: https://badgercropdoc.com/2020/06/02/wisconsin-winter-wheat-disease-upda...

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB update for PA 5/29/20

As disease pressure continues to build across PA, be sure to watch your crop carefully for flowering to time your fungicide applications. Continue to visit wheatscab.psu.edu to use the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center, as your fields begin to flower. For more details on spraying for scab, visit https://extension.psu.edu/fusarium-head-scab-update

Alyssa Collins, Extension Plant Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OH, 05/29/20

According to the head scab forecasting system (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/), the risk for head scab, and consequently , vomitoxin contamination of grain is current high across the state for wheat flowering today. I fact, the risk for scab has been high throughout the week due to the fact that it has been wet and warm. Most of the wheat in northern OH it either at or will soon be at the critical anthesis or flowering growth stage when infection by the scab fungus typically occurs. There is more rain and warm weather in the forecast, meaning that the risk will likely continue to be high as more fields in the northern third of the state reach anthesis. Plan to apply either Prosaro, Caramba, or Miravis Ace at or within the first 4-5 days after anthesis. This will reduce scab and vomitoxin by 50% of more.

Click on the link below to learn how to interpret the foresting system and identify the anthesis growth stage. https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2020-15/using-forecas...

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/27/20

High scab risk is predicted for all wheat of all resistance levels across much of the state according to the current risk model. Additionally, many varieties are moving into flowering or are currently flowering in much of the state with high risk. Now is the time to consider a fungicide application for fields that are flowering or are soon to be. With rains predicted in the coming days, it is important to remember that the optimal time for a fungicide application is at or within 5 days of flowering, so find the window to apply an effective triazole or triazole + SDHI fungicide when possible. Be sure to keep in mind the rainfast period when applying during these windows. DO NOT apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide as these fungicides can increase mycotoxin levels in the grain. Always read and follow label instructions when applying fungicides.

-- Kaitlyn Bissonnette, University of Missouri, State Field Crop Plant Pathologist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from WI, 05/27/20

Winter wheat in Wisconsin has responded to above average temperatures and rainfall, rapidly advancing through growth stages. In just a week or so, mainstems have rapidly elongated. In some varieties in southern and south-central Wisconsin, flag leaves are fully out. While now is a good time to consider a fungicide application, foliar disease has been non-existent in fields we have been in. We are monitoring the stripe rust situation carefully, and while it is active in states to our south, we have not observed any in fields we have scouted. The above average heat will also keep stripe rust moving slowly, especially in varieties with moderate resistance. So for now, I think we can hold off on fungicide. With margins being tight, I think it is wise to keep our fungicide application for Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab). Fungicides directed toward FHB are also effective against stripe rust, should it move in later in the season. Continue to scout fields between now and head emergence to catch any foliar diseases that might emerge. If interested in reading the rest of this update, click here: https://badgercropdoc.com/2020/05/27/wisconsin-winter-wheat-disease-upda....

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 05/26/20

Wheat in Central Kansas is now at the flowering stages of growth that are most vulnerable to Fusarium head blight (head scab). The risk model currently indicates a moderate and high level of risk for much of central Kansas with risk extending well into western Kansas. Growers in these areas should be preparing to apply fungicides when conditions allow. The best available options include Prosaro, Caramba and Miravis Ace. Products containing Strobilurin active ingredients are not labeled for Fusarium and these products should be avoided in areas at moderate or high risk of head blight.

--Erick De Wolf, Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 05/26/20

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center, 2020. The system has undergone some major revisions in the off-season and it may help to take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the new tools. The new interface focuses attention on the map-based risk of disease for the current date. The calendar icon that allows users to select dates of interest for your area. The date you select should correspond to times when your wheat is flowering, because the crop is most susceptible to infection at this stage. There is also a menu icon in the upper left corner that allows users to customize the model predictions for winter vs. spring wheat, and account for wheat varieties with different levels of genetic susceptibility to Fusarium head blight.

The focus of the prediction effort is currently on Central Kansas, Northern Missouri, Central Illinois, Central Indiana, Southern Ohio and Southeastern Pennsylvania where wheat is already at the heading and flowering stages of growth. The models a high level of risk for susceptible and moderately susceptible wheat varieties for much of this region. Growers in these areas should consult with local advisors to determine other local factors that might also influence the risk of disease.

--Erick De Wolf, Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NY, 05/22/20

Winter malting barley in much of New York is emerging from the boot and this is a critical time to consider a fungicide application. The Fusarium Risk Assessment Map (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/ ) today indicates a moderate to high risk of Fusarium head blight (FHB) for some areas of New York. Rain showers and thunderstorms are in local forecasts over the next week; duration of leaf/head wetness is more important for FHB development than is the amount of precipitation. Maximal suppression of FHB and grain contamination by deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin results when fully emerged heads of winter malting barley are sprayed with DMI (FRAC Group 3) containing fungicides Caramba, Prosaro, or Miravis Ace (latter includes FRAC Group 7 fungicide). A heads-emerged spray with these fungicides also protects upper leaves against fungal leaf blotches, powdery mildew, and rust. Scald has already been observed on susceptible varieties. Foliar sprays of any of these three products up to seven days after head emergence may still result in significant FHB and DON suppression. Fungicide products containing QoI (FRAC Group 11) fungicides should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain.

Winter wheat is generally a week or more behind in development from winter barley planted on the same fall date. Winter wheat in New York varies from stem elongation to flag leaf visible stages. We should reach the critical fungicide application window for winter wheat over the next two weeks. The DMI (FRAC Group 3) containing fungicides Caramba, Prosaro, or Miravis Ace (latter includes a FRAC Group 7 fungicide) are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and DON contamination when applied at flowering (emergence of yellow anthers on heads). A flowering application of these fungicide products should be based on Fusarium head blight (FHB) risk as well as the risks of powdery mildew, rusts, and fungal leaf blotches in the upper canopy based on scouting of individual fields. Stagonospora nodorum blotch and powdery mildew have already been observed. There is an application window of approximately 7 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB and DON suppression can be expected. Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/ ) and your local weather forecast frequently as your winter wheat crop approaches heading and flowering.

-- Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/20/20

With PA wheat now emerging from the head, many fields are on the verge of spray decisions as we see anthers popping out. Most of the state is in the “Low” risk category for Fusarium head blight infection at this time. If you choose to spray, target your wheat crop at early flowering. Caramba, Prosaro and Miravis Ace give good control of most leaf and head diseases, in addition to suppressing scab. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Continue to visit wheatscab.psu.edu to use the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center, as your fields begin to flower.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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