FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from SD, 07/01/19

Most of the winter wheat crop is past the window for fungicide application for FHB (scab) management. However, spring wheat in SD varies from jointing to flowering across the state; therefore, spring wheat may have a long window of exposure to conducive weather conditions for scab to develop. Currently, several areas in the eastern half of state and scattered areas West River are showing moderate to high risk for the scab to develop. Spring wheat in the moderate to high risk (yellow and red) areas that is at flowering or will be flowering in the next few days would benefit from a fungicide application to protect against scab and DON development. Also, several winter wheat fields scouted were found with leaf rust, therefore leaf rust inoculum is abundant for spring wheat which still has several weeks of development. A fungicide applied against scab will also protect against leaf rust and other fungal leaf diseases.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MN, 06/28/19

Small Grains Disease Update 06/28/2019

I visited the different yield trials near Rochester, LeCenter, Kimball, and Benson this week past week and talk with producers about their small grains so far this season at the different field days held at those trials.

Both the crops in the trials and in fields I visited look very good. The earliest barley, oat, and spring wheat fields have started to head across not just the south but even northwest Minnesota. These fields will quickly approach anthesis if they did not already with the rapid increase in daytime highs over the past few days.

Overall very little if any disease or insect problems could be found in the trials. The only exception being leaf rust in the lower canopy on susceptible rye varieties in the rye variety trials, a few stripe rust pustules on Prosper HRSW, and the start of net blotch on Pinnacle barley.

The scouts continue to find tan spot and aphids south of the US Hwy 2. Aphids counts are increasing and approaching threshold in a few instances.

The risk assessment models for all three leaf diseases had been trending higher this past week across most of the State. The expected daytime highs over the weekend and early next week will likely mean that the infection risk for tan spot will trend much lower while the risk for leaf rust, and Septoria infections will decline as well.

In contrast, the infection risk for FHB will likely continue to increase. Most of the state has, depending on the level of genetic resistance of the variety, had seen moderate to high risk for FHB in the past couple of days. Keep an eye on the risk models and seriously consider a fungicide treatment at Feekes 10.51 or beginning of anthesis.

--Jochum Wiersma, Extension Agronomist, University of Minnesota Crookston

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 06/28/19

Several spring barley fields are starting to head and spring wheat growth stages range from tillering to boot stages. Some of the earliest planted spring wheat may be heading and potentially flowering next week. The greatest amount of scab risk is on the eastern half of the state with another scab risk pocket in northwest ND. Rain is projected several times in the next week, and this combined with high dew point temperatures, will likely increase scab risk for some. Scout spring wheat fields to determine growth stage and start planning a fungicide application at early flowering in areas with the the greatest amount of scab risk. For barley, an application should be timed at complete full-spike emergence. With both spring wheat and barley, scab and DON suppression can still be achieved if a fungicide is applied 3-7 days after early flowering in wheat or full-head in barley.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 06/28/19

The focus of the forecasting effort is now on winter wheat in North Dakota and Northern Minnesota. The spring wheat crop in this area is still 2-3 weeks from the reaching vulnerable growth stages. The risk map is currently showing areas of moderate and high risk in eastern North Dakota. Growers in these areas should consult with local university extension and other advisors to further evaluate the risk of disease and need for fungicide treatment. Selecting the state of interest from the menu to the left of the map will zoom to show more detail and display commentary from local disease specialists.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/24/19

Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab) predicted risk is increasing for some locations in the northeast, southeast, and along Missouri River in SD. The risk is likely to increase especially for spring wheat, which is just starting to head. For locations found in the yellow and red areas and where wheat is starting to flower, a fungicide is advisable. The best fungicide timing for FHB and DON management is at flowering (50% of the plants have initial flowers). However if due to weather or other reasons this timing is not possible, a fungicide can still be applied within 6 days of flowering, but the fungicide efficacy reduces past the flowering time. Strobilurin fungicides (QoI, FRAC code 11) should not be applied to wheat after heading.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 06/24/19

Hard red winter wheat is at the heading to flowering growth stages. The spring wheat crop is still two to three weeks from heading and flowering. Currently, the greatest scab risk is in southeast ND and it is likely the eastern third of the state will be in high risk (susceptible variety) in the coming days. If a fungicide application is going to be made in winter wheat, the greatest suppression is achieved using Caramba, Miravis Ace, Proline and Prosaro. The best time to make the application is at early flowering (yellow anthers protruding from center of head). A fungicide application that occurs three to seven days after the onset of flowering can still provide good suppression of both FHB and DON.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MN, 06/21/19

Small Grains Disease Update 06/21/2019

Scouts continue to find tan spot in both winter wheat and spring wheat in their third week of scouting. Although the scouts have not encountered any leaf or stripe rust, others have found it in research trials on the St. Paul campus. Likewise, I have positively identified Septoria spp. in both oats and spring wheat in a few fields. The reported incidence in all cases has been relatively low. Tan spot severity is by far the highest in wheat on wheat.

The risk assessment models for all three leaf diseases have been trending higher this past week across most of the State. The immediate forecast suggests that this trend will continue.

The earliest seeded oat has or soon will reach Feekes 9 when the flag leaf has fully extended. Although the risk of crown rust is not forecasted on this website, there are enough parallels with leaf rust to suggest the risk of crown rust is on the rise. The buckthorn in my yard is covered with aecia that produce the aeciospores that will start the crown rust. A full labeled rate at Feekes 9 of a labeled fungicide provides the best protection against crown rust as many oat varieties are susceptible to very susceptible to crown rust.

The risk model for FHB continued to trend low for much of the State, largely because of the cooler temperatures rather than the absence of precipitation. Only the southeastern corner of the State has seen a persistent risk of moderate to high risk of FHB.

The immediate forecast indicates that the risk of FHB will be increasing across the state. The earliest seeded spring wheat will be heading the coming week in the southern half of the State. Keep an eye on the risk models and consider a fungicide treatment at Feekes 10.51 or beginning of anthesis if the risk models continue to trend towards moderate to high risk.

--Jochum Wiersma, Extension Agronomist, University of Minnesota Crookston

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 06/20/19

There are multiple reports of Fusarium head blight in parts of Central and Eastern Kansas. There are only reports of low levels of FHB from Western Kansas to date. The disease in Central and Eastern KS likely corresponds to infections that took place in the middle of May. The wheat in Kansas is maturing rapidly and will soon be ready for harvest. Growers in the Central and Eastern regions should be setting harvest priorities to focus on fields with the lowest disease levels, planning to adjust combines during harvest to clean out visibly scabby kernels, and making arrangements to segregate loads of heathy grain from those with less desirable levels of disease where possible.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 06/20/19

The focus of the forecasting effort is now on winter wheat in South Dakota and Southern Minnesota. The risk map is currently showing low risk in these areas. Growers in these areas should consult with local university extension and other advisors to further evaluate the risk of disease and need for fungicide treatment. Selecting the state of interest from the menu to the left of the map will zoom to show more detail and display commentary from local disease specialists.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/17/19

A good proportion of winter wheat in South Dakota is now in bloom (anthesis) or past bloom as of the week of June 17. The Fusarium head blight (FHB) predicted risk has not changed from last week (remains low) because of generally low relative humidity, which is the predictor of FHB. Scouting and watching the weather is encouraged until wheat is done flowering when the risk for scab considerably goes down. Most of the wheat fields scouted looked disease free especially the flag leaf and the leaf below flag leaf.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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