FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from ND, 06/25/18

Scab risk for susceptible varieties in North Dakota will likely increase in the coming days. In the next three days, scab risk for susceptible varieties will be moderate to high for a large portion of ND with the highest risk in SW and SE ND. Double check the level of susceptibility in the wheat variety used, monitor growth stage in and plan on using a labeled triazole for a fungicide application at early flowering in wheat or at full head in barley, especially in areas of moderate to high scab risk.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 06/18/18

The few winter wheat acres in North Dakota are headed out or in the flowering stages. Some of the earliest planted spring wheat has headed and will likely enter early flowering stages in the next 7 days. Presently, scab risk for susceptible varieties is low with a few pockets of moderate risk (northeast ND). Rain and high humidity from this past weekend will likely elevate scab risk in southeast ND. Another chance of sporadic rain may occur towards the end of the week, which may also contribute to elevating scab risk. Continue to monitor the growth stages in the field, keep note of field conditions (ie: morning dews), and apply a FRAC 3/DMI/Triazole fungicide at early flowering when warranted.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/18/18

A few areas in the south central and the east are showing some moderate to high risk for Fusarium head blight (FHB). If winter wheat is starting to flower or just got done flowering and you are in these areas, a triazole fungicide is recommended to control FHB. These areas got a few showers in the last few days hence the change in the FHB risk. Growers in other areas should keep checking on this tool until winter wheat is done flowering.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/15/18

The risk for Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab in winter wheat remains low throughout South Dakota. This is because of the dry weather conditions we are currently experiencing. A big portion of northeast part of the state is either abnormally dry or up to D2 (severe drought) drought category. Most of the winter wheat is done flowering and since the risk for scab is increased by wet and humid weather 15 days prior and during flowering, these fields have a low chance of getting FHB, should the weather conditions change. For fields not yet at flowering, growers are encouraged to keep checking on the FHB prediction tool, and plan a triazole fungicide at flowering growth stage if the risk for scab changes to moderate or high.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from WI, 06/06/18

The Wisconsin Field Crops Pathology Team has been busy scouting and rating diseases of winter wheat this past week across the major wheat growing region of the state. To be honest, it has been pretty boring for our group. We have seen virtually no disease in uniform variety trials or in production fields. This is good news for farmers, fo sure.

We have not yet confirmed any stripe rust infections in the state of Wisconsin, this season. Reports from farmers and consultants are also consistent with our observations. This is a considerable change from last season, when we found our first stripe rust pustules at the end of March. This early epidemic in 2017 resulted in some considerable yield loss from stripe rust on winter wheat. Definitely not the case this season. We have also seen extremely low levels of Septoria leaf blotch in the lower portions of the canopy on some varieties. Cool dry weather is preventing this disease from really moving up the canopy. No other foliar diseases have been confirmed on winter wheat this season.

As for the Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab) situation, risk as calculated by the Fusarium Risk Tool, has dissipated over the past week. Two weeks ago, risk of FHB had been estimated to be high on susceptible cultivars. However, cool dry weather has driven the risk to low levels across much of the major wheat production area of Wisconsin. Risk is high still along the Lake Michigan shore and up into Door County. Also elevated and high risk are estimated in Northwest Wisconsin on susceptible cultivars. The situation should be monitored closely in these areas on any crop heading into anthesis. Most of the wheat we have looked at across the southern, south-central, and north-eastern wheat production area of the state is through anthesis or will be by the end of the week. The FHB risk is forecast to be low through this period, in these areas. We will begin scouting for FHB damage in the next week or so, but we anticipate FHB to be mostly low in many areas, with some isolated pockets of higher levels.

It is important to continue scouting over the next couple of weeks. We are transitioning away form making fungicide spray decisions, but it is important to determine the level of FHB present in a particular field, so that proper harvest preparations can be made. We will continue to update you on what we find over the next couple of weeks. However, this is the lowest level of disease on winter wheat I have seen since I have been in Wisconsin. Scout, Scout, Scout!

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin-Madison

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from SD, 06/06/18

Winter wheat in South Dakota ranges between flag leaf and heading. One disease that is managed after wheat heading is Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab). This disease is promoted by warm and wet weather. Currently most of the areas in the state are tending towards being dry and therefore the risk for FHB at this time is low according to the FHB risk model. Growers are encouraged to keep monitoring the weather conditions and the FHB risk tool to determine the need for applying a triazole fungicide at wheat flowering to control FHB.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, Extension Plant Pathologist , South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 06/04/18

Unusually cool temperatures will cause our scab risk level to slowly decrease this week. However, most of the region is still at medium or high risk for scab infection right now due to the weather over the past several days. If your wheat is flowering now, please consider a fungicide application. Studies have shown that an appropriate fungicide application paired with a moderately resistant variety provides the best prevention of vomitoxin.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 05/31/18

Wednesday through Friday (May 23-25) of last week, I was in western Oklahoma (Clinton area) and at field days in the panhandle at Goodwell and Hooker (Texas County), Keyes (Cimarron County) and Balko (Beaver County). The only disease observed of significance was indicated by white heads in fields. Often this was the result of Fusarium (dryland) root rot as reported in the last update (May 17, 2018). In fields showing this root rot, the white heads and white tillers were scattered across the field with an incidence ranging from low to moderate. Other fields in the panhandle exhibited large areas of not just white heads and tillers, but also white secondary tillers that had not headed. In these fields, some root rot was found but Dr. David Marburger (OkSU Small Grains Extension Specialist) and I believe that many of the white tillers/secondary tillers were the result of drought, freeze, or a combination of both. Often such tillers showed clean lower stems with no indication of root rot. We believe these secondary tillers were completely white without heading because they were sloughed off as a result of the stress from drought, freeze, or a combination of both. We suspect that more of these whiteheads will show in the coming week in northwestern OK and the panhandle, but the wheat crop is quickly turning and the whiteheads may not be as evident.

This likely is the last update I will be sending out this season as harvest in the southern half of Oklahoma has started with the crop quickly maturing in the northern half.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from WI, 05/30/18

Warm weather last week, which continued into this week, has pushed the winter wheat crop in Wisconsin toward heading. Most varieties planted in the southern or south-central region of Wisconsin are heading, with full emergence and anthesis (flowering) beginning by the end of the week. We suspect that winter wheat in the northern and northeastern portions of the Wisconsin wheat belt to not be far behind.

Now is the time to consider your Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab) management strategy. Weather late last week had driven the FHB risk on the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center to a high level for susceptible varieties. Extremely hot and dry weather has forced the risk back to "low" today. However, 72 hour forecasts show risk increasing to medium in much of the wheat belt with high risk in isolated pockets on susceptible varieties (see figure). Rain today, with continued humidity and temperatures in the 80s F for the rest of the week, will keep risk elevated. Areas near the Lake Michigan shore will likely be at high risk.

A fungicide may be needed especially on susceptible cultivars to control FHB and reduce DON (vomitoxin) contamination. The fungicides Prosaro or Caramba have both performed well on FHB in Wisconsin. Timing of application of these products is critical. I would urge you to wait until anthesis has begun in your field before applying. We have observed poor control where application of these effective fungicides were made before anthesis. In fact, we have observed improved control of FHB and lower levels of DON in finished grain where fungicide application was delayed 4-5 days after the beginning of anthesis, compared to applications at the start of anthesis. Also, remember that application of fungicides should be made no later than 6-7 days after the start of anthesis. After this time, fungicide efficacy on FHB and DON control is much reduced.

Get out there and SCOUT, SCOUT, SCOUT and monitor the FHB Prediction Center!

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin-Madison

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MI, 05/30/18

Wheat is at the stage where growers should consider applying a fungicide where conditions are conducive to Fusarium head blight or leaf diseases. Currently, wheat is heading in many southern Michigan fields and, within a week, fields will likely head in the northcentral parts of the state. Once wheat is headed (the base of the head has cleared the base of the flag leaf), it usually takes 2 or 3 days for the first flowers (anthers) to appear. Fungicide applications for head scab should be made 2 to 5 days later. At this point, most or nearly all the heads will have at least one or more anthers. The recommended fungicides include Prosaro and Caramba. Risk has dissipated significantly over the past few days according to this forecast model. However, continue to check this site as there is marked differences in weather patterns across the state and rainfall is predicted for the next couple of days. Suppressing leaf diseases, in addition to head scab, has been a significant financial justification for the use of fungicides at this timing. Although these diseases have been slow to develop this season, wheat should be scouted regularly as foliar diseases can develop rapidly under favorable conditions.

--Martin Nagelkirk, Extension Educator, Michigan State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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