FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from PA, 05/01/19

Pockets of Western and Northeastern Pennsylvania show medium to high risk of infection at this time. Growers of barley in these areas should monitor crop development and plan to spray a fungicide if they are approaching heading. Caramba and Prosaro (Group 3) or Miravis Ace (Group 3 + 7), give good control of scab as well as most leaf and head diseases. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Most wheat in the area is at this time too young to spray for scab, but scout regularly to monitor for leaf diseases and crop development.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 05/01/19

Wheat in AR, Southern MO, TN, and Western KY is likely at or near the critical stages of growth. At this point, the forecasting model indicates that the risk of severe disease is low in most of these areas. There is a region of southern AR that appears to be a moderate or high risk, however, wheat in this area is likely past the most vulnerable growth stages. Late maturing fields may still be at risk for problems.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/30/19

Thanks to recent dry weather, scab risk is low for wheat flowering today throughout North Carolina. With little rain in the forecast, risk is likely to remain low. The susceptible stage is flowering for wheat, and heading for barley. Most North Carolina wheat has either already flowered, or is flowering now. Barley is likely past heading. Fungicides aimed at scab reduction are not recommended when scab risk is low.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 04/29/19

Wheat in the Eastern Shore of Maryland has booted and should be heading out soon. Barley is already flowering there. FHB risk has slightly increased to moderate level in parts of the state over the past week. Growers here should keep an eye on the FHB risk, as crop heads and flowers here in coming weeks. Fungicides Prosaro, Caramba and Miravis-Ace should be effective in minimizing damage due to FHB in wheat, when applied at flowering. Wheat is considered to be at flowering when at least 50% of the heads of a field are beginning to show yellow anthers. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be applied now, as they might increase the chances of DON content in the grains. Up in the northern part of the state wheat is at second node to flag leaf stage, predictably around 2-3 weeks away from flowering.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 04/29/19

Wheat is beginning to progress into the heading and flowering stages in the Southern parts of the state, but risk of FHB remains low at this time. With wet weather expected for much of the week in Southeastern, Missouri, FHB risk may likely increase in the critical flowering stages. If a fungicide application is considered, the fungicides Prosaro and Caramba applied at Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of the plants in the field are beginning to flower) are considered the best options for FHB management. University research also has shown that the application of a fungicide up to 5 days after Feekes 10.5.1 may provide similar control. Strobilurin-containing fungicides are not labelled for control of Fusarium head blight and, if applied at later growth stages such as Feekes 10.5.1, may result in increased DON levels in the grain.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OK, 04/27/19

Reports of rust activity definitely were on the upswing this past week in Oklahoma. At the field day yesterday at Chickasha in central OK, I saw only sparse stripe rust, but I also heard reports that sounded to me as though rust (both stripe and leaf rust) will be making a strong appearance in Oklahoma. Lance Embry (WestBred/Monsanto) indicated he had recently been in central Texas and saw severe stripe and leaf rust, with a slight edge to the stripe rust. Heath Sanders (SW OK Area Extn Agronomy Spclt) indicated that earlier in the week he saw some stripe rust and tan spot in Tillman County (SW OK), but that overall the leaves looked pretty good. This is consistent with what Gary Strickland observed in southwestern OK last week, where he indicated,
“I was in several fields yesterday. Most fields are boot (some are a little later yet) to heading (some fields have just started blooming). I found incidence of both stripe and leaf rust. However, in only 2-3 fields was it heavy enough (combined with a good yield potenetial, 45+ bushels) and had advanced up the plant that I felt like spraying was an immediate need. In most other fields while I would find both species low on the plant or mid-way in the plant but it was typically very low severity. So, in the end both species were present but I think stripe rust was probably more prevalent. But overall, severity is not high for either rust species. I found no powdery mildew. Septoria and a little tan spot were present but the Septoria is still the predominant disease that I am seeing. In nearly all cases it remains low on the plant. In one field it had advanced mid-way up the plant and caused a lot of yellowing of the lower leaf canopy but again that has just been in one case. With high field moisture present and humid canopy conditions existing I am telling producers to keep a close eye on their field because conditions are right for the disease to spread quickly.”

Moving a bit northward in Oklahoma, Lanie Hale (Wheeler Brothers) reported the following while scouting fields north and west of Loyal to Okeene and Hitchcok and then to just east of Canton, OK:
“I found Stripe Rust in two fields and one field with leaf rust. Some of the fields I checked were repeats of 10 days ago where I found no rust. The Septoria and Tan Spot are now on the third leaf down with occasional spots on the second leaf and flag leaf. Aphids infestations are still heavy in some fields and on the heads in one field I looked at. I’ve seen a couple of small Army worms on the beards; something else to watch for with the good moisture and heavy wheat. A good number of heads in most fields show some freeze damage to the top 2-4 kernels, plus some trapped and twisted heads especially on the field edges.”

Note in Lanie’s observations that he also is seeing the leaf spotting diseases tan spot and septoria as well as aphids and some army worms. Regarding the leaf spot diseases and aphids, this is similar to what I saw and have heard from others. The leaf spot diseases typically don’t move up onto the upper leaves in Oklahoma unless we have continued cool and wet weather, which appears to be in the forecast for at least the next week. However, Lanie indicates he has seen some spots up on the flag leaf and the leaf just under the flag. Hence, application of a fungicide in these cases at this point in time will also help in managing the rusts. For more information on applying fungicides and their relative effectiveness in managing foliar diseases, see OCES Current Report (CR-7668) that can be found at:
http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-4987/CR-7668w...

Moving still further north and northwest in Oklahoma, Josh Bushong (NW OK Area Extn Agronomy Spclt) reported seeing, “No PM (powdery mildew), LR (leaf rust), or YR (stripe rust) found in Roger Mills (checked all 20 varieties in demo plot) and Blaine counties.”

These reports lead me to believe that leaf spot diseases (septoria and tan spot) are more prevalent than typical for the western half of Oklahoma. Further, the rust (both leaf and stripe) are making their entrance considerably later than typical for Oklahoma, but with continued relatively mild temperature and moisture I would look for all these foliar diseases to increase.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 04/26/19

Wheat in southeastern and south-central Kansas is at flag leaf emergence, and boot. Wheat in these areas will reach the growth stages critical for Fusarium in roughly 10-14 days. We will be monitoring for the risk of disease and provide more updates soon.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 04/26/19

Some of the wheat that is furthest along in S IL will be approaching heading within the next 7-10 days. Temperatures will remain cool to moderate, with chances of rain over this period. Remember that fungicide applications targeting FHB should be made between the start of flowering (FGS 10.5.1) through 5-6 days post flowering. This timing has been the most consistant for reducing both FHB symptoms and DON. Reccomended products include PRosaro, Caramba, and Miravis Ace. Avoid products containing QoI's (FRAC group 11) after flag leaf emergence as these may increase DON levels in some instances.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KY, 04/26/19

Wheat fields in the southern part of the state are beginning to flower, while fields in other parts of the state likely will begin flowering within the next few days.

The current risk of Fusarium head blight is low; however, any future rainfall events that may occur while wheat is in a susceptible stage for infection by the Fusarium head blight pathogen (beginning flowering thru soft dough) may change the risk level.

Fungicides that are effective in managing Fusarium head blight and the associated mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON; vomitoxin) include Caramba (BASF Corp.), Prosaro (Bayer CropScience), and Miravis Ace (Syngenta Crop Protection). In general, in university research trials, the most effective application timing for management of Fusarium head blight and DON has been Feekes 10.5.1 (beginning flowering).

--Carl Bradley, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Kentucky

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/26/19

Wheat in AR, TN, NC and Southern MO is likely at or near the critical stages of growth. At this point, the risk of severe disease is low or moderate, in most of these areas. There is a region of southern MS, AL and GA that appears to be a moderate or high risk, however, wheat in this area is likely past the most vulnerable growth stages.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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