FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from AL, 04/05/17

Scab risk remains high for Baldwin and Mobile Counties in SW AL with lmedium risk in Escambia Co. Low risk reported for rest of Alabama but heavy rains are anticipated today and tomorrow (6th), then dry weather for a week. So, the scab risk may be elevated by heavy rainfall for other areas of South and Central AL. Leaf rust development has continued in SW AL and pathogen spread may occur with strong NE of thunderstorms over the next day.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/04/17

This is the first North Carolina scab risk commentary for the 2017 scab monitoring season. In most of NC, wheat is still 2-6 weeks from the period when Fusarium infects heads, which is flowering. In the southern part of the Coastal Plain, the earliest wheat varieties are heading this week, but most of the crop is at flag leaf emerged or just emerging. Barley is heading in the Coastal Plain. Currently, scab risk is low in all the wheat- and barley-growing areas of NC. The forecast holds only a small amount of rain, suggesting that risk will remain low for the next 10-14 days. There is no need to treat for scab when risk is low. Updates will be provided for the next 6 weeks.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 04/03/17

The FHB forecasting site indicates that the risk of disease is KS is moderate or high in many areas of the state. Fortunately, the crop is not at the growth stages that are vulnerable to the disease. The crop will not reach the susceptible stages for another 7 to 10 days in the Southeast corner of the state. Other areas of the state are probably more than two weeks out. This moisture is important because it favors the development of the Fusarium fungus and increases the chances that it will reproduce and release spores when the crop does reach the critical growth stages. Additional periods of high RH will be needed at that time for the disease to develop.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 04/03/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The current focus of the prediction models is on the Southern US where the wheat is approaching or already at the flowering growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection. There is a large section of southern LA is at moderate or high risk for disease. A few counties of MS and AL are also showing moderate or high risk of severe disease. Growers in this area should check with their local extension specialists or crop consultants for additional evaluations of disease risk. The risk KS, MO, IL, IN and OH is likely too early to pose any actual disease threat because the crop is still too young in these areas.

The northern portion of the risk map is gray because the wheat crop these areas is not at growth stages that are vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The system will automatically adjust to show these northern regions as the season progresses.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 03/24/17

The risk of Fusarium head blight in Kansas is low. The wheat crop is most vulnerable to Fusarium infection at the flowering growth stage or the early stages of grain development. The critical growth stages for Fusarium head blight will occur in approximately three weeks. Dry weather conditions are holding most leaf diseases at low levels, but recent rains may stimulate some activity.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 03/24/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The current focus of the prediction models is on the Southern US where the wheat is approaching or already at the flowering growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The current risk map indicates that the chance of severe Fusarium Head Bight is low in most areas of the Southern US but there is a section of southern Louisiana that is at moderate or high risk for disease. Growers in this area should check with their local extension specialists or crop consultants for additional evaluations of disease risk.

The northern portion of the risk map is gray because the wheat crop these areas is not at growth stages that are vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The system will automatically adjust to show these northern regions as the season progresses.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from AL, 03/24/17

Scab risk for Baldwin Co. in SW AL is medium while the remainder of the state is at a low risk for scab development in wheat. Very early varieties are heading in that area of Alabama and if the heads were not damaged by last week’s freeze, need to be treated with a recommended fungicide for scab. However, rain is predicted this weekend and most of next week, so the scab risk will likely increase. Otherwise, the early varieties in the wheat variety trial at the Gulf Coast Research and Extension Center and Brewton Agricultural Research Center were largely free of foliar diseases. However, many of the mid- and late-maturing varieties in that trial have already suffered heavy leaf rust damage, so growers and consultants in that area need to scout for leaf rust and apply a fungicide at flag leaf and possibly flowering to control this disease.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KS, 03/16/17

The wheat crop is still at the pre-jointing stages of growth and is not vulnerable to Fusarium infection. Dry weather conditions are holding most leaf diseases at low levels.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 03/16/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The system is now active for the 2017 growing season. The current focus of the prediction models is on the Southern US where the wheat is approaching or already at the flowering growth stages that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The current risk map indicates that the chance of severe Fusarium Head Bight is low in most areas of the Southern US.

The northern portion of the risk map is gray because the wheat crop these areas is not at growth stages that are vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The system will automatically adjust to show these northern regions as the season progresses.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 03/06/17

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The system is now active for the 2017 growing season. The current focus of the prediction models is on the Southern US. The crop is generally considered ahead of schedule this year and some fields in southern LA and MS may be approaching or already at the growth that are most vulnerable to Fusarium infection. The current risk map indicates that the chance of severe Fusarium Head Bight is low in most areas of the Southern US.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

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