FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from WI, 06/19/14

I have scouted winter wheat fields and variety trials from Arlington Wisconsin up through Chilton Wisconsin this week, between rain showers. Wheat in these areas is nearly finished flowering. The window of opportunity to spray fungicides in these areas to control Fusarium head blight (scab) in winter wheat has now passed.

Currently the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu) is predicting moderate to high risk for head blight for the Door county peninsula and areas immediately adjacent to Green Bay. Winter wheat that is currently flowering in this area of the state is at high risk for infection by the fungus that causes scab. The prediction center is currently predicting low levels of scab in other parts of the state. This should be monitored closely by growers with barley. Some late-planted barley will be emerging from the boot soon and this is the window of opportunity to control scab if conditions are conducive. With all the rain and warm temperatures across the state this week, I would suspect that the risk for scab on barley and any remaining flowering winter wheat will be elevated this weekend across much of the state.

If a fungicide is warranted for control of scab on winter wheat in the Door County area or barley, products such Prosaro, Caramba, or similar that contain triazole active ingredients can offer suppression of scab and reduce deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulation in harvested grain. These products should be applied within a week from the beginning of flowering for reasonable control. Products containing strobilurin fungicides should be avoided on wheat that has headed. Research has demonstrated that levels of DON can be higher after treatment with strobilurin products after heading.

While scouting winter wheat fields at University of Wisconsin variety trials in the southern and eastern part of Wisconsin this week, I observed no rust or powdery mildew. Trace levels of barley yellow dwarf were noted at all locations. At the Fond du Lac variety trial, high levels of Cephalosporium stripe were noted on certain varieties. This location has seen short rotations between wheat crops, likely contributing to this epidemic. We also noted high incidence (90%) of bacterial leaf blight on several varieties at this location. Some bacterial leaf streak was also observed, but incidence was less than 10%. Very low levels of Stagnospora/Septoria leaf blotch were noted. Most varieties had just completed flowering at this location and no scab was observed as of yet.

At the Chilton Variety trial, diseases are nearly absent. The only disease noted on several varieties was bacterial mosaic at low incidence (

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from NY, 06/18/14

Winter wheat and barley in New York State are now past the flowering and early post-flowering stages, so fungicide applications are no longer advised on winter cereals. Attention now turns to spring wheat and especially to spring malting barley crops some of which have emerged from the boot and have begun flowering. The next 10 days will be critical for farmers making fungicide spray decisions for suppression of Fusarium head blight (FHB) and protection of flag leaves from foliar diseases in spring cereals. The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads) or at full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot). A flowering application of triazole fungicide should be based on Fusarium head blight (FHB) risk as well as the risks of powdery mildew, rust, and fungal leaf blotches in the upper canopy based on scouting of individual fields. There is an application window of approximately 5-6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected. Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. The current risk of FHB epidemics is moderate to high for spring wheat and barley over much of the state; that risk could remain high if warm, humid conditions with frequent rainfall continue through this week.

Check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently as your crop approaches flowering. FHB symptoms are beginning to appear in winter cereals so this is an excellent time to scout your winter cereal fields to assess FHB incidence and to identify fields that may be at higher risk for DON toxin contamination.

--Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from US, 06/16/14

Welcome to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center. The Prediction Center displays daily risk maps for Fusarium head blight throughout the eastern half of the US. The focus of the risk is now on SD, MI, and NY where wheat is likely flowering or early stages of kernel development that are most vulnerable to the disease. The risk is currently low in most areas of MI; however, NY is showing some areas of moderate risk. Wheat in SD is also likely at the critical stages of growth also. Be sure to select the appropriate model (winter or spring wheat) and the individual states from the menu options on the left. Disease specialists in each state have the opportunity to provide commentary about the risk of disease in their area. Selecting a state allows you to zoom in for more information and see the specialist comments.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from KS, 06/13/14

The wheat crop in Kansas is now approaching maturity in much of central KS. The north central region and northwester regions are in milk and dough stages of kernel development. Weather conditions continue to be extreme in KS this spring with prolonged drought giving way to frequent rains and extended periods of high relative humidity. The risk model is indicating the moderate or even high levels of risk for parts of central KS. Despite this favorable weather, the risk of severe FHB in KS remains low this year because the timing favorable weather did not coincide flowering and early stages of grain development that are most favorable for Fusarium infection. This weather is coming late to significantly influence the disease situation in the state because the crop is now approaching maturity.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from MI, 06/11/14

A relatively dry weather pattern has minimized any risk of head scab for the bulk of MI’s wheat crop. However, some wheat will not begin to flower for another week in the cooler regions of the state. For growers in these areas, it would be wise to check this prediction model as conditions may become more favorable for the disease during the next several days. Pressure from leaf diseases continue to be light, though some leaf spots can readily be found on the lower canopy within many fields. Leaf rust has also been found, and this may prove to be a concern given the state’s late maturing crop. Armyworm moth catches have been very low this season so it is likely that an application of an insecticide along with your fungicide will be not be cost effective.

--Martin Nagelkirk, Extension Educator, Michigan State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from SD, 06/11/14

We have had a lot of moisture in the past week, but the last few days have been dry in most parts of the state. This has led to lower risk scab prediction. But some parts of the state in the central and east have moderate levels of scab prediction. If there is a lot of dew on leaves in morning, infection can still take place. Scab can be managed by applying a triazole fungicide within 3 days before flowering and 6 days after flowering.

--Emmanuel Byamukama, SDSU Plant Science Dept., South Dakota State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from NY, 06/10/14

Most of the winter wheat and barley in New York State initiated flowering over the past 10 days, under low forecast risk of Fusarium head blight (FHB). The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads) or at full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot). A flowering application of triazole fungicide should be based on Fusarium head blight (FHB) risk as well as the risks of powdery mildew, rust, and fungal leaf blotches in the upper canopy based on scouting of individual fields. There is an application window of approximately 5-6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected. Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. The risk of FHB epidemics forecast by the model remains low to moderate for crops flowering today. But I urge growers to check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently if your crop has just begun or is about to begin flowering. We will consider the risk of FHB infection of spring wheat and barley in New York starting next week.

--Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from WI, 06/06/14

Winter wheat in the southern portion of Wisconsin is heading and will be flowering in the next few days. This is a critical time to control Fusarium head blight (scab). Currently the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu) is predicting low risk for head blight for most of the state of Wisconsin. Rain is forecast for this weekend and early next week. This may increase the risk for head blight, so growers and consultants should watch the weather and the FHB Prediction Center carefully if their wheat is flowering.

Areas of the state also have malting barley and risk for FHB can be high if conditions are favorable during barley head emergence. Timing of fungicide application should occur as the head is emerging to protect open flowers if the weather is conducive for FHB.

If a fungicide is warranted for control of scab, products such Prosaro, Caramba, or similar that contain triazole active ingredients can offer suppression of scab and reduce deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulation in harvested grain. These products should be applied within a week from the beginning of flowering for reasonable control. Products containing strobilurin fungicides should be avoided on wheat that has headed. Research has demonstrated that levels of DON can be higher after treatment with strobilurin products after heading.

No rust or powdery mildew has been observed in wheat that I have looked at. Reports from area extension personnel and consultants also confirm these observations. Wheat appears to be relatively disease free in much of the state this year.

--Damon Smith, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Wisconsin

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from NY, 06/04/14

Much of the winter wheat and barley in New York State has initiated flowering in the last few days and the remainder of fields are likely to flower over the next week. So the next week remains critical for farmers making fungicide spray decisions for suppression of Fusarium head blight (FHB) and protection of flag leaves from foliar diseases. The triazole products Caramba and Prosaro are the most effective fungicides for suppression of FHB and deoxynivalenol (DON) toxin contamination when applied at wheat flowering (emergence of anthers on heads) or at full head emergence in barley (anthers begin to appear on barley before heads emerge from the boot). A flowering application of triazole fungicide should be based on Fusarium head blight (FHB) risk as well as the risks of powdery mildew, rust, and fungal leaf blotches in the upper canopy based on scouting of individual fields. There is an application window of approximately 5-6 days from the beginning of flowering in which reasonable FHB suppression can be expected. Fungicide products containing strobilurins should not be applied to headed wheat or barley as they may result in increased levels of DON in grain. So far the risk of FHB epidemics forecast by the model has remained
low through the early flowering period. And the forecast for precipitation remains low for the next few days. But I urge growers to check the Fusarium Risk Assessment Tool (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) and your local weather forecast frequently as your crop approaches flowering. We will consider the risk of FHB infection of spring wheat and barley in New York in a few more weeks.

--Gary Bergstrom, Extension Plant Pathologist, Cornell University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from OH, 06/02/14

A June 2 Update: Wheat across Ohio is now between anthesis and early grain-fill. Barring a few late-planted fields in some parts of Northern Ohio that are now at the flowering growth stage, most of our wheat reached anthesis late last week and during the weekend. During that time, the risk for scab remained low, and will likely continue to be low this week, as indicated by the scab risk tool. This is probably because we have had at least 4 rain-free days over the last week. Interestingly, however, relative humidity was very high on several of those days and continues to be high in some areas of the state. In spite of the low risk prediction, Prosaro was still applied to some fields over the weekend. As the wheat enters early grain-fill, the risk for scab decreases considerably, even though late infections may still occur, especially if conditions remain humid, and such late infection may still lead vomitoxin contamination of the grain. However,
at this point, the model seems to suggest that 2014 will likely be a low scab and vomitoxin year in Ohio.

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

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