FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from NC, 05/08/14

Wheat is currently near flowering or recently past flowering across the state. Thankfully, scab risk has dropped statewide due to recent dry weather. Current weather forecasts indicate little or no significant chance of rain in the coming week. Therefore, small grain crops that are heading and flowering in the next 2 weeks should remain at low risk of head scab, and will not need a fungicide targeted at this disease.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from DE, 05/07/14

Fields continue to develop at an uneven pace. Most wheat in Delaware is still between Feekes 6 and 8, with some at Feekes 10. Expect growth to jump quickly with warm temperatures towards the end of the week and the beginning of next week. Some areas received rain today and additional wet, warm weather is expected next week. Fields at Feekes 10 now may be entering flowering around that period. Foliar diseases tend to be low on the canopy in most fields and at low severity levels.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from KY, 05/07/14

Early wheat varieties are now headed out and some are flowering in southern Kentucky. In many other fields, wheat is in or entering the head emergence stages. FHB fungicides will begin to be applied about the middle of next week and will continue for about 2 weeks. Presently the risk is low across Kentucky, but rains being forecast for this weekend and mid next week suggest to me that the FHB risk could change rapidly. Recent warm conditions with adequate soil moisture have likely encouraged the FHB fungus to become active in residue and I sense that any significant rainy period over a 2-3 day period could prompt spores to be released. If this occurs in the vicinity of or downwind to a fully headed wheat crop, the FHB risk could be considerable. If I had a decent wheat crop and it would be fully headed by this weekend to mid next week, I would seriously consider spraying an FHB fungicide, such as Caramba or Prosaro just before, at or up to five days after the target 10.51, early flowering timing. The risk map is green for now across KY, but I do not think that status will hold. I hope I am wrong.

--Don Hershman, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Kentucky

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from AL, 05/06/14

Wheat in north AL is flowering but scab risk is low in that area. Light to moderate scab noted in wheat variety trial in Fairhope, AL. Heaviest scab in early as compared with later maturing wheat lines. Previous crop in study area was corn. Disease also seen in area wheat fields by consultants, which is very unusual. So far, only scattered heads have been found. Pressure from other diseases statewide ranges from non-existent to light. Rust found on only one variety in Fairhope wheat variety study along with light glume blotch. No disease activity in wheat variety trial at Tennessee Valley study site. Have confirmed diagnosis of BYD in wheat from Northeast AL farm sites.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from TN, 05/06/14

Wheat in Tennessee varies from beginning to bloom to just heading. Presently the risk is low across the state, but with warmer temperatures and rain in the forecast for some areas, the low risk for FHB might change over the next week, especially for wheat planted north of I-40. For more information on fungicides and FHB in Tennessee visit UTcrops.com

--Heather Young-Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from KS, 05/06/14

Wheat in southern Kansas is now entering the heading and flowering stages of growth. Drought continues to dominate wheat production in Kansas. Weather conditions have been unseasonably hot and dry this week and the risk of severe FHB in Kansas is low.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from DE, 05/06/14

Fields continue to develop at an uneven pace. Significant variability in growth stages can be found within fields and experimental test plots. This is likely a result of persistent cool temperatures. Timing any fungicides this season will be problematic due to the within field variability. Wheat throughout Delaware is still between Feekes 6 and 8. Expect growth to jump quickly with warm temperatures towards the end of the week. Most fields are still at least 10 days from flowering.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from AR, 05/05/14

The risk of scab remains low across all of Arkansas. Growth stage is advancing quickly with recent high temperatures. Most wheat south of I-40 is past flowering and likely will not be affected by scab. Most wheat north of I-40 is flowering or will be flowering soon. There is no need for a fungicide specifically for scab.

--Gene Milus, Plant Pathologist, University of Arkansas

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from DE, 05/03/14

Most of Delaware and parts of Maryland received a substantial amount of rain this past week, but temperatures remain cool. Wheat across Delaware is between Feekes 6 and 8, and I expect significant growth progress based on increasing temperatures and light showers ahead. Some foliar diseases are popping up, but overall levels are low.

Barley is starting to come out of boot in many parts of the state. I do not currently recommend an application for FHB management but if you choose to make an application ensure that at least 35% of your main tillers have emerged fully from the boot. Those of you double cropping to lima beans should be aware of label restrictions to Prosaro and Caramba. Proline is a good alternative in these instances.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from OK, 05/03/14

Wheat around Stillwater is mostly at GS 10.5.1 (start of flowering) and is looking dry. With temps forecast in the upper 90s for the next 3-4 days and no rain, conditions will continue to deteriorate. Areas in other parts of the state are worse, with only a few areas better.

This past week I traveled from to southwestern OK stopping at numerous fields along the way as well as the variety trials or demonstrations at Kingfisher (60 miles southwest of Stillwater), Granite (southwestern corner of OK) and El Reno (20 miles west of OKC). Typically wheat was at my knee height or shorter and thin. I saw no foliar diseases, but did find several locations where I believe wheat streak mosaic and/or high plains disease was present. Samples are being evaluated to confirm, but samples processed by the Diagnostic Lab this past week from the panhandle and from central OK would support this (i.e., positive for Wheat streak mosaic virus and/or High plains virus). I also have noted symptoms of barley yellow dwarf in my trials around Stillwater, but no stunting is associated with these symptoms most likely indicating a spring infection. I did have a report from Roger Musick in central Oklahoma that he found a high incidence of tan spot and light leaf rust in a no-till wheat field under pivot irrigation. That is the only confirmed report of foliar disease I have received.

--Bob Hunger, Extension Plant Pathologist, Oklahoma State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

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