Mid West - Mid South SWW Region's blog

FHB Update from IL, 06/05/20

Wheat in the Northern part of the state has started to flower this week, whereas wheat in the central part of the state has just finished flowering. Warm, wet weather will continue to elevate FHB risk in flowering wheat, and a fungicide application of Caramba, Prosaro, Proline, or Miravis Ace are suggested at this time. Applications are most efficacious when made following label directions between the start of flowering and 5 days after this point in time. Flowering is defined as the point in time when 50% of main tillers have started to push anthers. Do not apply products containing strobilurins for FHB management.

Wheat in the southern part of the state should now be showing symptoms and signs of FHB if severe infection occurred (bleached heads/portions or heads/spikelets with salmon colored growth). Recent surveys indicate that overall FHB levels are likely low in this part of the state. The central part of Illinois however, was under high risk across wheat resistance levels during the critical flowering period and should be monitored closely over the coming days. Symptoms of FHB will be most observable 18-24 days after flowering. If severe FHB is detected, you should be prepared to take measures to remove contaminated grain. These include increasing combine fan speeds and openings to blow out lightweight, FHB-infested grain, harvesting infected fields as early as possible (and preferably first) and if possible, storing grain from infested fields separately from quality grain. Ensure that grain is dried (15% optimal) to minimize continued growth of pathogen and DON accumulation in storage.

-- Nathan Kleczewski Ph.D., University of Illinois, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OH, 05/29/20

According to the head scab forecasting system (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/), the risk for head scab, and consequently , vomitoxin contamination of grain is current high across the state for wheat flowering today. I fact, the risk for scab has been high throughout the week due to the fact that it has been wet and warm. Most of the wheat in northern OH it either at or will soon be at the critical anthesis or flowering growth stage when infection by the scab fungus typically occurs. There is more rain and warm weather in the forecast, meaning that the risk will likely continue to be high as more fields in the northern third of the state reach anthesis. Plan to apply either Prosaro, Caramba, or Miravis Ace at or within the first 4-5 days after anthesis. This will reduce scab and vomitoxin by 50% of more.

Click on the link below to learn how to interpret the foresting system and identify the anthesis growth stage. https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2020-15/using-forecas...

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to http://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/27/20

High scab risk is predicted for all wheat of all resistance levels across much of the state according to the current risk model. Additionally, many varieties are moving into flowering or are currently flowering in much of the state with high risk. Now is the time to consider a fungicide application for fields that are flowering or are soon to be. With rains predicted in the coming days, it is important to remember that the optimal time for a fungicide application is at or within 5 days of flowering, so find the window to apply an effective triazole or triazole + SDHI fungicide when possible. Be sure to keep in mind the rainfast period when applying during these windows. DO NOT apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide as these fungicides can increase mycotoxin levels in the grain. Always read and follow label instructions when applying fungicides.

-- Kaitlyn Bissonnette, University of Missouri, State Field Crop Plant Pathologist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/14/20

Wheat in the southern part of Illinois is currently flowering to past flowering. Wheat in the central part of the state is approaching heading in many fields. With warmer temperatures forecast I expect many fields in the central part of the state to flower next week. Rains are forecast during this time as well, which may elevate risk for FHB in wheat flowering during this period. Replicated research indicates all suggested fungicides for suppressing FHB are most efficacious in suppressing vomitoxin when applied between FGS 10.5.1 through 5 days after 10.5.1. FGS 10.5.1 is defined as the point where 50% of the main tillers have started to flower in a field. Symptoms of FHB are typically most pronounced 18-24 days after flowering.

Suggested fungicide products for suppressing FHB and vomitoxin include Prosaro, Caramba, Miravis Ace, and Proline (if following with vegetables). Ensure that all label directions are being followed to ensure proper application and to ensure optimal performance. Do not apply fungicides that contain a strobilurin (FRAC group 11) as these have been associated with enhanced DON in replicated research trials. Continue to monitor your fields and the FHB prediction center as you approach the most critical times for applying in season fungicides for FHB.

-- Nathan Kleczewski Ph.D., University of Illinois, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/05/20

Early planted wheat has started to flower in the southern part of Illinois. Although conditions have been cool, persistent rains continue to elevate levels of FHB risk in flowering, highly susceptible wheat varieties. Suggested fungicide products for suppressing FHB and vomitoxin include Prosaro, Caramba, Miravis Ace, and Proline (if following with vegetables). Replicated research indicates all of the suggested products are most efficacious in suppressing vomitoxin when applied between FGS 10.5.1 through 5 days after 10.5.1. FGS 10.5.1 is defined as the point where 50% of the main tillers have started to flower in a field. Ensure that all label directions are being followed to ensure proper application and to ensure performance. Do not apply fungicides that contain a strobilurin (FRAC group 11) as these have been associated with enhanced DON in replicated research trials. Continue to monitor your fields and the FHB prediction center as you approach the most critical times for applying in season fungicides for FHB.

-- Nathan Kleczewski Ph.D., University of Illinois, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 04/30/20

Wheat has begun flowering in the southeast region of the state and is moving full on into heading in the rest of the southern part of the state. Overall risk for FHB development remains low for most varieties that fall in the Moderately Susceptible and Moderately Resistant categories. As wheat starts to head out and flower in the rest of the state in the coming weeks, there are a few things to consider when determining whether a fungicide application will be warranted in your field. Consider the resistance level of the variety, the weather conditions present, and if wheat is flowering or approaching the flowering stage. If considering a fungicide application, the optimal time to apply a fungicide at or within 5 days of flowering. It is not recommended to apply a strobilurin containing fungicide as these fungicides can result in increases in mycotoxins in the grain. Always read and follow label instructions when applying fungicides.

-- Kaitlyn Bissonnette, University of Missouri, State Field Crop Plant Pathologist

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 04/28/20

Illinois FHB update. Nathan Kleczewski Field Crop Plant Pathologist, UIUC

Some of the earlier planted wheat in the southern portions of the state may be heading by the end of this week. After heads have cleared the ligule, you generally have 3-5 days before the start of flowering (Feekes growth stage (FGS) 10.5.1.). Forecasts are not calling for significant rain over the next 10 days as of today (4/28), and the current risk for moderately susceptible wheat heading into flowering within the next 3-5 days should remain low. Continue to scout fields and monitor this site for updates as your wheat in these areas enter the critical period for FHB. If considering a fungicide, suggested products include Prosaro, Caramba, Miravis Ace, and Proline (if following with vegetables). Replicated research indicates all of the suggested products are most efficacious in suppressing DON when applied between FGS 10.5.1 through 5 days after 10.5.1. FGS 10.5.1 is defined as the point where 50% of the main tillers have started to flower.

--Nathan Kleczewski Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist

FHB Update from OH, 06/03/19

Most of the wheat fields in the northern half of the state reached anthesis last week. The remaining fields will reach this critical growth stage during this week. The risk for Fusarium head blight (FHB) has been moderate-to-high over the last 5-7 days on susceptible varieties planted in the northwest corner of the state. However, persistent rainfall, soggy fields, and difficulties scheduling an aerial application, prevented some fields from being sprayed to control scab and vomitoxin at the anthesis/flowering growth stage. If the risk for scab was high a few days ago when your field reached anthesis, but you were unable to apply a recommended fungicide, you can still make an application up to 6 days after anthesis and see good results in terms of scab and vomitoxin control. This is true for Prosaro, Caramba, and Miravis Ace. Applications made 4-6 days after anthesis are effective against scab and vomitoxin and are particularly useful when the weather following anthesis is consistently favorable for scab. In fact, even if the scab risk had decreased over the last few days, a late application would still be warranted, given that conditions were favorable for scab during the week leading up to anthesis.

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 06/03/19

Much of the wheat has flowered in the S and Central parts of IL. Expect late flowering wheat in the N most parts of IL to flower within the next 7-10 days. Over that period of time additional rains are forecast, which may slightly elevate risk levels. Wheat that flowered approximately 3 weeks ago should be showing symptoms of disease if infections occurred. For more on harvest-based management strategies for FHB go to http://cropdisease.cropsciences.illinois.edu/?p=908

Remember to switch the model to best approximate the resistance level of your varieties. The map defaults to susceptible, but your risk will change substantially if you planted moderately resistant or even moderately susceptible varieties.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/24/19

Model predictions for FHB risk have been reduced greatly over the past week. Many wheat varieties have finished or are finishing flowering in the southern part of the state. For the northern and central wheat growing areas of the state, some pockets of moderate to high FHB risk are predicted for moderately susceptible and susceptible varieties if approaching flowering in the coming days. Monitor fields for potential flowering date to determine if or when a fungicide application may be warranted. Fungicides in the triazole class such as Prosaro or Caramba are most effective when applied at 50% flowering, or Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of heads are flowering) but can be applied up to 5 days after flowering and still provide similar control. Strobilurin-containing fungicides are NOT labeled for the control of FHB and may result in increased DON levels in the grain. It is important to always follow harvest restrictions and label instructions when applying fungicides.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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