Mid Atlantic SWW Region's blog

FHB Update from PA, 05/21/19

With many fields flowering now across the state, infection risk remains high in several areas. Scattered showers and storms over the weekend kept moisture levels up in localized regions. If a spray window presents itself, fungicide is advised.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/20/19

Wheat in the North-western counties (Frederick, Howard, Carroll, Harford counties) of the state is flowering currently. The FHB risk across the state continues to be high, so if your wheat is flowering, it’s recommended to spray fungicides for managing FHB. The best stage for spraying fungicides is early flowering or within 4-5 days of that. The fungicides effective for FHB are Prosaro/ Caramba/ Miravis-Ace. All of these fungicides are pre-mixed and do not need to be tank mixed with any other product for spraying. Read the label carefully for recommended rates and harvest restriction times. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be sprayed at this stage. Aerial application at a rate of 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre with 300-350 um droplet size is recommended. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30°-45° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Wheat in the Eastern shore is already past the stage for both FHB infection and fungicide spray.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/17/19

Despite a window of lovely weather Friday, infection risk remains high across PA. Please monitor your crop development and consider a fungicide at flowering.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from DE, 05/14/19

Wheat in lower Delaware has finished flowering and wheat in Kent and New Castle counties range from head emergence through flowering. The entire state is at high FHB risk. If your wheat is flowering (yellow anthers visible on 50% of main tillers), it is advised to make a fungicide application for management of FHB. The advised window for fungicide application is flowering until 4-5 days after flowering. Fungicides for FHB include Caramba, Miravis-Ace, and Prosaro. Fungicides containing strobilurins should be avoided at this growth stage. Applications should be made at the full recommended rate in 15 gallons per acre (gpa) with 300-350 um droplet size for ground application and 5 gpa recommended for aerial application. Spray nozzles should be pointed toward the grain heads (30-45° angle from horizontal), with forward and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray (Twinjet).

--akoehler, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/14/19

Wheat in the Eastern shore has finished flowering, except for a few late planted fields. Up in the north, wheat is anywhere from head emergence to beginning of flowering. The FHB risk for Maryland is high across the state. If your wheat is flowering (50% of the main tillers showing yellow anthers), it is advised to spray fungicides for scab. The best stage recommended for spraying fungicides is early flowering or within 4-5 days of that. The fungicides effective for FHB are Prosaro/ Caramba/ Miravis-Ace. These fungicides do not need to be tank mixed with another product for spraying. The fungicide products should be applied at the full rate recommended by the manufacturers. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be sprayed at this stage. Aerial application at a rate of 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre with 300-350 um droplet size is recommended. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30°-45° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/13/19

The majority of PA is under high scab infection risk this week. This risk will persist as long as conditions remain damp. If your wheat will be flowering in the next several days, be prepared to target a fungicide application at early flower. If leaves dry sufficiently to allow for application but more rain is threatening, know that most of the scab products become rainfast very shortly after application (even within 15 min), and so you needn’t worry about rain washing your product off. If you have missed the early flowering timing, a fungicide may still be applied 5-7 days following the ideal target and still provide some scab protection. Be sure to observe label restrictions.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/10/19

Wheat in the Eastern Shore of Maryland is finishing up flowering. The risk for FHB is high. If you haven’t sprayed and you are still within 4-5 days of flowering, you can still do so. Wheat in the Northern parts is heading now and will soon start flowering. The FHB risk for this part of the state is also predicted to be high, and the farmers should be prepared to spray fungicides on their wheat when it flowers (50% of the main tillers showing yellow anthers). The fungicides effective for FHB are Prosaro/ Caramba/ Miravis-Ace. The best stage recommended for spraying fungicides is early flowering or within 4-5 days of that. These fungicides do not need to be tank mixed with another product for spraying. The fungicide products should be applied at the full rate recommended by the manufacturers. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be sprayed at this stage. Aerial application at a rate of 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre with 300-350 um droplet size is recommended. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30°-45° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. There has been no other major disease being seen anywhere across the state in wheat so far.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/09/19

Wheat that is flowering now or in the next several days in southern PA should be sprayed for scab if at all possible. Weather conditions are conducive for infection in most regions of the state. If spraying at early flowering is not possible, a fungicide application up to 6 days later will provide some suppression of the disease. Keep an eye on your label to understand post-harvest interval restrictions.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 05/07/19

Fusarium head blight risk is continuing to increase in parts of Virginia. Much of the wheat in the southern part of the state is past the vulnerable flowering stage, but wheat that is at or about to enter flowering may be at risk. Consider applying a fungicide if risk is moderate to high, especially on susceptible or moderately susceptible varieties. Wheat that has completed flowering is no longer at risk. Fungicides should be applied at early flowering or up to one week later. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide since this can increase DON contamination. Recommended fungicides include Prosaro, Caramba, Proline, and Miravis Ace.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/06/19

Recent wet and mild weather is driving up scab risk across Pennsylvania. Keep a close eye out for anthers emerging from progressing wheat and consider your spray decisions. Sprays prior to heading do not suppress scab, but one labeled fungicide, Miravis Ace, may be applied at 50% heading. The best control with all fungicides will result from spraying at the first sign of anthers. Caramba and Prosaro (Group 3) or Miravis Ace (Group 3 + 7), give good control of scab as well as most leaf and head diseases. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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