Southern Atlantic SWW Region's blog

FHB Update from NC, 04/30/19

Thanks to recent dry weather, scab risk is low for wheat flowering today throughout North Carolina. With little rain in the forecast, risk is likely to remain low. The susceptible stage is flowering for wheat, and heading for barley. Most North Carolina wheat has either already flowered, or is flowering now. Barley is likely past heading. Fungicides aimed at scab reduction are not recommended when scab risk is low.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/22/19

Wheat flowering today is at medium to high scab risk in scattered but widespread areas of the central NC Tidewater zone. Late-planted fields may not be near flowering yet, but those planted on time may be. Apply fungicide at early flowering if risk is high then. If necessary, spraying up to 6-7 days after early flowering should be nearly as effective. Fungicides are significantly less effective against scab when applied prior to flowering. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. The most effective products for scab are Caramba, Prosaro, Miravis Ace, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from GA, 04/18/19

Wheat scab risk is high in most of the state. It’s especially sensitive timing for mid Georgia and the Piedmont area. If wheat is flowering, apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Labeled fungicides include Caramba, Prosaro, Proline, Folicur, Tilt, and Miravis Ace. The most effective products are Prosaro, Caramba, Proline and Miravis Ace (as per NCERA 184 wheat fungicide table). Avoid applying a strobilurin-containing fungicide.

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/15/19

Pockets of medium to high scab risk for wheat flowering this week have opened up in southeast NC, specifically Onslow, Pender, and adjacent counties. Late-planted fields are likely not near flowering yet, but those planted on time may be. Fungicides are significantly less effective when applied prior to flowering. Apply fungicide at early flowering. If necessary, up to 7 days later should be almost as effective. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, Miravis Ace, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/10/19

This is the first North Carolina small grain scab risk commentary for the 2019 season. In most of NC, wheat is still 1 to 5 weeks from the period when Fusarium infects heads, which is flowering. Barley has headed or will soon head in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Currently, scab risk is low in all the wheat- and barley-growing areas of NC. The forecast holds only a little rain, which means risk should remain low for the next 10-14 days. There is no need to treat for scab when risk is low at flowering. Updates will be provided for the next 6 weeks.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from GA, 04/10/19

Wheat scab risk is moderate to high in several southwest GA counties. Crawford, Lamar, Monroe, Macon and Upson counties show moderate risk. If the risk in your area is moderate to high and wheat is flowering, apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Avoid applying a strobilurin-containing fungicide. FHB labeled fungicides include Caramba, Prosaro, Proline, Folicur, Tilt, and Miravis Ace. The most effective products are Prosaro, Caramba, Proline and Miravis Ace (see NCERA 184 wheat fungicide table for reference).

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from GA, 04/02/19

Currently, FHB risk assessment map indicates low development potential across Georgia. However, weather patterns and forecasted rain events for the weekend and following week can potentially increase the risk of FHB. Therefore, remain vigilant.

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 05/08/18

Wheat crops that are flowering now in northeast NC are at moderate risk of scab. Much of the crop there has already flowered and is past danger, but some fields are flowering now or will flower in the next 2 weeks and are at risk. It will pay to spray if the variety is susceptible or moderately susceptible, and possibly if it is moderately resistant. Apply fungicide at early flowering or up to 7 days later. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide. The most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from GA, 05/02/18

FHB risk remains low across Georgia. Wheat in south and central Georgia is approaching maturity and should no longer be vulnerable to FHB infections. Limited FBH damage, if any, was observed this year in research trials in Plains, GA and commercial fields in south GA. Wheat planted on time in the Piedmont area is past flowering, reducing the potential for FHB infections. One sample with confirmed FHB originated in Grady county in extreme south GA where the infection was minimal.

--Alfredo Martinez, Plant Pathologist, University of Georgia

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from NC, 04/23/18

For wheat flowering now, scab risk is low across North Carolina due to recent dry weather. Rain predicted for April 23-28 will make conditions more conducive to scab for wheat flowering in the coming 10 days. However, considering the amount of moisture predicted, risk for wheat flowering later this week and next week will likely remain low in most of North Carolina, with the likely exception being the Tidewater area. If your wheat is flowering in the next 2 weeks, monitor scab risk closely, especially if you have susceptible varieties.

Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide after flag leaf stage. For scab, the most effective products are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. Aerial application may be profitable. For ground application, rear- and forward-facing nozzles should be angled down 30 degrees from horizontal.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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