FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from DE, 05/11/14

The forecast is currently calling a 20-40% chance of storms in parts of Delaware from Tuesday through Thursday. Most wheat is at Feekes 8-9, some is close to heading. With the rain we had in parts of the region last week, there is a chance that inoculum of FHB is starting to pick up and some additional rain may be all that is needed to release inoculum. Those individuals with fields that were heading late last week may enter flowering during this period. You have a 5 day window to hit for fungicide applications after the start of flowering without a dropoff in DON suppression.. The best fungicides for DON suppression are Prosaro, Caramba, and Proline, but Folicur and Tilt have subtle activity if nothing else is available. Fungicides for FHB suppression will also handle foliar diseases, which have been low in the canopy in most fields.

Do not use fungicides containing a group 11 active ingredient (e.g. Quilt, Aproach Prima, Stratego, Headline, Quadris, etc.) as these fungicides have been associated with increased DON levels when applied to heads. Remember that fungicide use will not get you much more than 42-45% control of DON at best unless they are applied to a moderately resistant variety, in which case 75% control is achievable.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from IL, 05/09/14

Wheat fields in parts of southern Illinois are just beginning to head out and flowering will begin very soon in these fields. The current risk of Fusarium head blight (FHB) for southern Illinois is low. As long as the sun is shining and the wind is blowing, heads will remain relatively dry and FHB risk will continue to be low. However, rain is in the forecast for the next few days for these areas, so risk could be elevated in the near future.

If the decision is made to apply a fungicide for management of FHB, it is important to use the most effective products and to target the most appropriate timing. Research at the University of Illinois and other universities has shown that Caramba and Prosaro fungicides are the most efficacious fungicides available in reducing FHB and the associated mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON; a.k.a "vomitoxin"), that can contaminate grain. The best fungicide application timing for FHB management is when flowering is beginning to occur (Feekes growth stage 10.5.1), when anthers are beginning to extrude from the middle part of the wheat heads.

--Carl Bradley, Associate Professor / Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from IN, 05/09/14

Wheat in southern Indiana is heading and may begin flowering this weekend or in the coming week. Currently, the risk is low across southern Indiana, but the recent and forecasted rain may increase risk for wheat in this area in the coming week. Producers in southern Indiana should be prepared to apply a fungicide. Fungicide applications should be applied at early flowering to be most effective. Indiana research indicates that applications of the fungicides Prosaro and Caramba are most effective at managing FHB if they are applied at early flowering (Feekes growth stage 10.5.1). Other products are available, but may not be as effective.

--Kiersten Wise, Extension Plant Pathologist, Purdue University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from NC, 05/08/14

Wheat is currently near flowering or recently past flowering across the state. Thankfully, scab risk has dropped statewide due to recent dry weather. Current weather forecasts indicate little or no significant chance of rain in the coming week. Therefore, small grain crops that are heading and flowering in the next 2 weeks should remain at low risk of head scab, and will not need a fungicide targeted at this disease.

--Christina Cowger, Plant Pathologist, USDA-ARS and North Carolina State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from DE, 05/07/14

Fields continue to develop at an uneven pace. Most wheat in Delaware is still between Feekes 6 and 8, with some at Feekes 10. Expect growth to jump quickly with warm temperatures towards the end of the week and the beginning of next week. Some areas received rain today and additional wet, warm weather is expected next week. Fields at Feekes 10 now may be entering flowering around that period. Foliar diseases tend to be low on the canopy in most fields and at low severity levels.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from KY, 05/07/14

Early wheat varieties are now headed out and some are flowering in southern Kentucky. In many other fields, wheat is in or entering the head emergence stages. FHB fungicides will begin to be applied about the middle of next week and will continue for about 2 weeks. Presently the risk is low across Kentucky, but rains being forecast for this weekend and mid next week suggest to me that the FHB risk could change rapidly. Recent warm conditions with adequate soil moisture have likely encouraged the FHB fungus to become active in residue and I sense that any significant rainy period over a 2-3 day period could prompt spores to be released. If this occurs in the vicinity of or downwind to a fully headed wheat crop, the FHB risk could be considerable. If I had a decent wheat crop and it would be fully headed by this weekend to mid next week, I would seriously consider spraying an FHB fungicide, such as Caramba or Prosaro just before, at or up to five days after the target 10.51, early flowering timing. The risk map is green for now across KY, but I do not think that status will hold. I hope I am wrong.

--Don Hershman, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Kentucky

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from AL, 05/06/14

Wheat in north AL is flowering but scab risk is low in that area. Light to moderate scab noted in wheat variety trial in Fairhope, AL. Heaviest scab in early as compared with later maturing wheat lines. Previous crop in study area was corn. Disease also seen in area wheat fields by consultants, which is very unusual. So far, only scattered heads have been found. Pressure from other diseases statewide ranges from non-existent to light. Rust found on only one variety in Fairhope wheat variety study along with light glume blotch. No disease activity in wheat variety trial at Tennessee Valley study site. Have confirmed diagnosis of BYD in wheat from Northeast AL farm sites.

--Austin Hagan, Extension Plant Pathologist, Auburn University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from TN, 05/06/14

Wheat in Tennessee varies from beginning to bloom to just heading. Presently the risk is low across the state, but with warmer temperatures and rain in the forecast for some areas, the low risk for FHB might change over the next week, especially for wheat planted north of I-40. For more information on fungicides and FHB in Tennessee visit UTcrops.com

--Heather Young-Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from KS, 05/06/14

Wheat in southern Kansas is now entering the heading and flowering stages of growth. Drought continues to dominate wheat production in Kansas. Weather conditions have been unseasonably hot and dry this week and the risk of severe FHB in Kansas is low.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

FHB Update from DE, 05/06/14

Fields continue to develop at an uneven pace. Significant variability in growth stages can be found within fields and experimental test plots. This is likely a result of persistent cool temperatures. Timing any fungicides this season will be problematic due to the within field variability. Wheat throughout Delaware is still between Feekes 6 and 8. Expect growth to jump quickly with warm temperatures towards the end of the week. Most fields are still at least 10 days from flowering.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Extension Specialist, University of Delaware

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs