FHB Alert Blog

FHB Update from US, 03/21/18

The Fusarium head blight prediction center resumed activity for the 2018 growing season this week. The southern states including LA, MS, AL and GA are the current focus of the prediction effort. Over the next few weeks, wheat in these states will likely reach the flowering and early stages of grain development that are most vulnerable to infection by the Fusarium fungus. The current risk of severe disease is low in the southern region of the US.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from LA, 03/21/18

Wheat stages across the state range from jointing to flowering. For the most part, risk for scab for flowering wheat is low this week. However, there is a chance of rain in the forecast for next week. Plans should be made to protect vulnerable wheat prior to rain events.

--Trey Price, Extension Plant Pathologist, Louisiana State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 03/20/18

Welcome to the PA commentary for the Fusarium Head Blight Risk Assessment Tool, 2018! If you are new to this risk tool or haven’t used it in a while, please click and read the “User Guide” on the left hand side of your screen. The first paragraph has the main steps to get you started with the model.

If you’d like to receive scab updates directly to your e-mail or via text, please sign up at http://scabusa.org/fhb_alerts.

Also, if you're not subscribed to Field Crop News, you can sign up to receive timely articles right to your inbox every week. Visit https://extension.psu.edu/forage-and-food-crops/agronomic-crops and click the orange "SIGN UP" box on the left hand side of the page.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 09/05/17

The wheat growing season is over in most areas of the country and the Fusarium prediction center is no longer actively generating new risk maps. The risk maps from 2017 will remain available until the system resumes activity next February. To access these risk maps, select the assessment dates of interest from the calendar interface to the left of the risk maps. Thanks for a great season. We hope you will join us again in 2018.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 08/02/17

The focus of the Fusarium prediction center remains on the northern spring wheat production regions of ND, and MN. The risk models are indicating moderate to high risk for the northern areas of these states. Some late planted fields may still be at flowering stages that are most vulnerable for infection. Growers should in these areas should work with local extension specialists to evaluate the risk in their area.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from US, 07/24/17

The focus of the Fusarium prediction center remains on the northern spring wheat production regions of ND, and MN. The risk models are indicating moderate to high risk for the northern areas of these states. Some late planted fields may still be at flowering stages that are most vulnerable for infection. Growers should in these areas should work with local extension specialists to evaluate the risk in their area.

--Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathologist, Kansas State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 07/20/17

Scab risk for susceptible varieties northeast ND is moderate to high. The northern half of the Red River Valley also is in a moderate to high risk for scab. Several fields are progressing into dough stage, yet there are several late planted wheat fields that are flowering. Pay attention to the growth stage in late planted fields and use the model to assess scab risk. With the recent rain and higher humidity projected, scab risk is likely to remain moderate to high in areas of elevated risk.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from ND, 07/10/17

Most of the spring wheat and durum is headed or in the flowering stages. There are several late-planted fields that are approaching flag leaf. Currently, a moderate scab risk for susceptible varieties exists in northeast ND and areas near Grand Forks, ND. High humidity and rain are predicted for these areas in the next couple days, thus a moderate risk will likely remain. However, temperatures will climb into the 90's toward the end of this week and extend into next week. This may lower scab risk if humidity values are low.

--Andrew Friskop, Cereal Extension Pathologist, NDSU Department of Plant Pathology

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MN, 07/06/17

Growth stages are ranging from Zadocks Growth stage 50 - 80 (inflorescence emergence to early dough development) across the state state. The warmer temperatures around the July 4th holiday, combined with rain events have seen growth stages advanced rapidly. With higher temperatures fields which are close to flowering will start to flower quickly and for those that have still to apply fungicide for Fusarium head blight control, fields should be watched closely so as not to miss the optimal spray timing at early flowering. Flowering in warm temperatures will be shorter, the period lasting 3-4 days. If no anthers are visible, open up spikelets to check for either green immature anthers, or if the plant has already flowered, embryonic grain development, which will be visible roughly four days after flowering.

The high humidity and warm temperatures are ideal for FHB development at this time. The risk model is currently trending moderate to high high risk in the North Central and North Eastern part of the state for moderately susceptible varieties, and largely moderate risk in these areas for moderately resistant varieties with a few hot spots of high risk in the next 24 to 48 hours.

Field observations again indicate that there is plenty of early awn infection and inoculum present in the Northwest part of the state, and Fusarium symptoms are now being reported in Southern MN where the crop is more advanced.

--Madeleine Smith, Plant Pathologist, University of Minnesota

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MN, 06/30/17

In MN temperatures have fluctuated greatly within the past few weeks. Despite this, the overall spring wheat crop looks to be doing well in terms of disease. In many areas spray applications for FHB are being contemplated at this time. The risk model is trending high risk in the Northwestern part of the state for super susceptible varieties e.g. Mayville. The two day forecasting for moderately resistant varieties is low to moderate risk . Despite this, many areas are experiencing periods of high relative humidity after storm events. Premature discolouration of awns, indicating FHB infection, is prevalent in these areas. Therefore, use of fungicide to control FHB for moderately resistant varieties should also be considered. Applications should be made at early flowering (Feekes 10.5.1). If not possible at this time, applications up to five days post-flowering have been shown to have some efficacy. Always check current labels for pre-harvest interval and other use restrictions.

--Madeleine Smith, Plant Pathologist, University of Minnesota

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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