Mid West - Mid South SWW Region's blog

FHB Update from OH, 05/22/18

For those fields of wheat flowering and fields of barley head-out today (May 22), the risk for head scab is moderate in the northern-most counties and in the eastern portion of central Ohio. Persistent rainfall and high relative humidity over the last several days are the primary reasons for the moderate-risk prediction in those regions. But thanks to relatively cool temperatures, and dryer conditions in some cases, the risk remains low in most other areas of the state. However, this picture will likely change over the next few days as it warm-up, continues to rain, and more fields reach the flowering/heading growth stage. Continue to keep your eyes on the weather and the forecasting system, and be prepared to apply a fungicide. Wheat fields flowering and fields of barley still heading later this week and into the weekend (May 24-27) in the northern half of the state will likely be at the greatest risk for scab. Be prepared to protect them. Prosaro and Caramba are the two fungicides recommended for head scab management, and you will have a 4-5-day window from the day the crop reaches the critical growth stage (heading for barley and flowering for wheat) to make an application. Do remember to stay away from the strobilurins when the risk for scab is high as this group of fungicides has been linked to higher grain contamination with vomitoxin.

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/22/18

Wheat is finishing flowering in the southern half of the state but may be beginning or continuing to flower as you move northward. Scab risk has remained relatively low across much of Missouri in the past few weeks, but has increased in some isolated areas. If growing an FHB susceptible variety in one of these areas, a well-timed application of a triazole fungicide such as Prosaro, Caramba, or a generic tebuconazole at Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of the field flowering) could help to reduce potential kernel damage and DON accumulation. A fungicide application up to 5 days after Feekes 10.5.1 also has been found to provide similar control. DO NOT apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide as it can result in increased DON accumulation.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/21/18

The majority of wheat in the state started to flower at some point last week, with any remaining wheat likely to flower by the end of this week. The weather thusfar has not been conducive for FHB and model predictions indicate a low potential for outbreaks this season. Regardless, scouting for FHB should occur around 18-24 days after flowering, as this is the time when you are most likely to see the distinctive pink discoloration and bleaching contrasted with healthy, green heads. If a significant portion of the field contains FHB, that field should be scheduled for early harvest, and fan speeds increased to remove tombstones.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from OH, 05/15/18

Although the wheat crop is now flowering in some southern counties, the scab forecasting system (http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu/) indicates that the risk of head scab is low (the map is green), suggesting that conditions have not been favorable for the scab fungus to infect. However, if you still plan to spray for head scab, Prosaro or Caramba should be your fungicides of choice. The new fungicide, Miravis Ace, which seems to be just as effective as Prosaro and Caramba, based on a limited number of trials, is probably not yet available. STAY AWAY from the strobilurins when it comes to head scab management. These fungicides tend to increase rather than reduce vomitoxin contamination.

Continue to monitor the crop and the weather in the north. Barley will begin heading-out later this week and into next week, while wheat is still about a week away from heading in the north and about two to three weeks away from flowering. There is still ample time to apply a fungicide for head scab and vomitoxin control, if conditions become favorable during the next few weeks.

--Pierce Paul, Extension Plant Pathologist, Ohio State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/14/18

In Missouri, FHB risk predictions have indicated that risk of infection was low throughout this past week as wheat has begun to flower in much of the southern part of the state. However, as the humidity begins to increase and the forecast calls for intermittent rain events, the risk of FHB could increase in some areas. If a fungicide application is considered, the fungicides Prosaro and Caramba applied at Feekes 10.5.1 (50% of the plants in the field are beginning to flower) are considered the best options for FHB management. University research also has shown that the application of a fungicide up to 5 days after Feekes 10.5.1 may provide similar control. Strobilurin-containing fungicides are not labelled for control of Fusarium head blight and, if applied at later growth stages such as Feekes 10.5.1, may result in increased DON levels in the grain.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/09/18

Storms are pushing through today (5.9.18) which may increase FHB risk in some areas. Early wheat has headed in some parts of the state and will likely start flowering by the end of the week. Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline can be applied from the start of flowering (50% of main tillers starting to flower) through about a week after this point without a loss in efficacy. Other active ingredients such as tebuconazole (Folicur etc) and propiconazole (Tilt etc) can be used but are not very efficacious for FHB. Do not apply products containing a strobilurim (QOI: FRAC group 11) to heads as these active ingredients have been demonstrated to increase vomitoxin in our replicated trials. Additional information can be found http://cropdisease.cropsciences.illinois.edu/

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MO, 05/08/18

Wheat in Missouri is behind in its normal development due to an unusually cool and dry April. This means that much of the wheat in the southern portion of the state is only at the heading stage while wheat in the northern part of the state is at the flag leaf to boot stage. Disease reports have overall been minimal due to the dry conditions. As the wheat approaches the flowering stage in the southern half of the state, FHB risk may increase with the forecast calling for precipitation in some areas. In the coming weeks, continue monitoring your FHB risk with the FHB risk assessment tool. Updates to follow as the crop begins to flower.

--Kaitlyn Bissonnette, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Missouri

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from KY, 05/06/18

Wheat is beginning to flower in some fields in Kentucky. Although the Fusarium head blight risk prediction is currently low, additional rain in the forecast for later in the week may raise the risk. From multi-state university research trials, the products that have shown to be the most efficacious in managing Fusarium head blight and the associated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON; also known as vomitoxin) are Caramba, Prosaro, and Proline. The best application timing for management of Fusarium head blight and DON is when 50% of the plants in a field are beginning to flower (Feekes growth stage 10.5.1). University research has shown that fungicide applications within a few days after Feekes 10.5.1 (up to about 5 days), may provide similar control levels; however, it is important that preharvest intervals are observed and followed according to fungicide labels. Avoid applying fungicides that contain strobilurin active ingredients at late growth stages, as DON levels in grain may actually increase.

--Carl Bradley, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Kentucky

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from IL, 05/04/18

This is the first FHB post of the 2018 season. Currently wheat in the state is at or near boot in more southern portions of the state and at or near flag leaf emergence heading from latitudes between Germantown and Champaign. Current forecasts call for a cool down in temperatures and some precipitation, which may slow crop development somewhat. Diseases in the crop have been low. Continue to check this page over the upcoming weeks as the crop approaches flowering for updates.

--Nathan Kleczewski, Research Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, University of Illinois

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from TN, 05/03/18

Wheat continues to bloom in TN and in general there is low risk for FHB based on the model, scattered showers forecasted for the next day or two may increase risk on a local level. Consider your risk based on variety susceptibility, rain forecast, and field history (wheat after corn is at higher risk).

--Heather Young-Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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