Mid Atlantic SWW Region's blog

FHB Update from MD, 05/22/18

With the recent wet period and warm temperatures, FHB risk in the state of Maryland continues to be very high. Growers having their wheat flowering now are advised to spray triazole fungicides (Prosaro/Caramba) for FHB. Aerial application at a rate of 5 gallons per acre or ground application at 15 gallons per acre with 300-350 um droplet size and nozzles angled down 30 to 45 degrees from horizontal is recommended. If flowering has finished, fungicide spray will not help to reduce FHB and DON contamination of grains. Do not spray strobilurin-containing fungicides.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/21/18

Scab risk continues to be very high across PA this week. If your wheat has begun to flower, spray at your earliest opportunity to protect it from infection. Recent wet weather will cause spores to continue to form all week. Time your application on fields that are at the beginning of flowering, up to about 5 days following the beginning of flowering. Remember, sprays applied PRIOR to flowering will NOT provide significant suppression of scab or toxin production. Caramba or Prosaro are effective on scab and give control of most leaf diseases and glume blotch. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. If these products are unavailable, Proline and Folicur (which together provide the same chemicals as Prosaro) may be tank mixed at a rate of 3 + 3 fl oz/A. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Do NOT use any strobilurin-containing fungicides at heading or beyond.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/15/18

Wheat is anywhere from beginning to heading to past-flowering in Maryland. With the current wet weather, the risk of FHB is increasing in the region. Farmers who currently have their wheat flowering are advised to spray for FHB. Those who will have flowering in the coming week or so are advised to be prepared to spray, keeping a close watch on the risk forecast. If the wheat is already past flowering, you don’t need to spray. The fungicides recommended for FHB are Prosaro, Caramba, or Proline. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 05/15/18

FHB risk is increasing in Virginia and will continue to increase over the next several days. Risk is highest on the Eastern Shore, but susceptible varieties such as Shirley that are flowering over the next week will be at moderate to high risk in many portions of the state. Growers should monitor the FHB risk tool as their wheat crop begins to flower and consider applying a fungicide if risk is moderate to high. Wheat that has completed flowering is no longer susceptible to infection. Fungicides should be applied at early flowering or up to one week later. Do not apply a strobilurin-containing fungicide since this can increase DON contamination. Recommended fungicides include Prosaro, Caramba, and Proline.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/14/18

If you have wheat flowering this week or barley heading this week in DelMarVa or most of Pennsylvania, please consider spraying your crop for scab if you have not done so already. Persistent wet weather and warm temperatures are triggering Medium to High risk levels in many areas of the region. Time your application on fields that are at the beginning of flowering, up to about 5 days following the beginning of flowering. Remember, sprays applied PRIOR to flowering will NOT provide significant suppression of scab or toxin production. Caramba or Prosaro are effective on scab and give control of most leaf diseases and glume blotch. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. If these products are unavailable, Proline and Folicur (which together provide the same chemicals as Prosaro) may be tank mixed at a rate of 3 + 3 fl oz/A. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Do NOT use any strobilurin-containing fungicides at heading or beyond.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 05/09/18

The FHB risk for Virginia remains low in most areas. However, risk is moderate to high for wheat currently flowering in coastal areas. For FHB control in wheat, apply Prosaro, Caramba, or Proline at beginning flowering or up to one week later. For barley, fungicides should be applied at head emergence. Do not apply a strobilurin containing fungicide after the flag leaf emergence stage since this can increase DON levels in the grain.

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/09/18

Wheat in lower Delaware is flowering, and barley in lower Pennsylvania is heading. If you farm in these areas, your scab infection risk is currently low, with the exception of the extreme southeast corner of Sussex County, DE. As temperatures warm and humidity increases across the region, it is likely our infection risk levels will increase. Please stay tuned to this risk tool since the crops are moving along, too. Be prepared to spray a fungicide on fields that are at the beginning of flowering, up to about 5 days following the beginning of flowering. Remember, sprays applied PRIOR to flowering will NOT provide significant suppression of scab or toxin production. Caramba or Prosaro are effective on scab and give control of most leaf diseases and glume blotch. They do not need to be tank mixed with another product to control these diseases. If these products are unavailable, Proline and Folicur (which together provide the same chemicals as Prosaro) may be tank mixed at a rate of 3 + 3 fl oz/A. Spray nozzles should be angled at 30° down from horizontal, toward the grain heads, using forward- and backward mounted nozzles or nozzles with a two directional spray, such as Twinjet nozzles. Do NOT use any strobilurin-containing fungicides at heading or beyond.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from MD, 05/09/18

Wheat growers in Maryland have so far been fortunate this year for having low disease pressure from leaf rust, powdery mildew and even scab!! In the south (Eastern shore), wheat is flowering currently. With consistently warmer temperatures now, a few incidences of leaf diseases are being observed. Triazole fungicides: Prosaro/ Caramba/ Proline that are the scab fungicides should provide control against these as well. Strobilurin containing fungicides should not be sprayed at this stage, as they may lead to DON accumulation in grains. Up in the north, flag leaves are emerging. No diseases being seen so far here as well. Growers should keep an eye on the FHB risk, as crop heads and flowers here in coming weeks.

--Nidhi Rawat, Small grains Pathologist, University of Maryland

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from PA, 05/02/18

Scab risk is currently low across the region, and will continue to be over the next few days. As temperatures have jumped, rains have ceased, and so conditions are not conducive to infection. Continue to watch the risk model since barley in the southern parts of the region has begun to head out.

--Alyssa Collins, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Penn State University

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

FHB Update from VA, 04/30/18

As wheat starts flowering in the region, it is time to consider whether or not to make a fungicide application for Fusarium head blight (FHB). Currently, risk is low in most parts of Virginia. There are a few exceptions, including portions of the Eastern Shore, where risk is moderate to high. The most effective fungicides for control of FHB and DON are Caramba (metconazole), Prosaro (prothioconazole + tebuconazole), and Proline (prothioconazole). Less expensive triazoles such as Tilt (propiconazole) and Folicur (tebuconazole) will provide some control, but if FHB risk is high these fungicides are unlikely to prevent unacceptable levels of DON contamination. Keep in mind that fungicides containing a strobilurin should not be applied after the flag leaf stage since they can increase DON contamination. To maximize their effectiveness, fungicides for FHB and DON control should be applied at early flowering or up to one week later. Fungicides that control FHB and DON will also control foliar diseases including powdery mildew, leaf rust, stripe rust, and leaf blotch. Stripe rust has been found in NC and was recently reported from a single field in Warsaw, VA so be sure to scout susceptible varieties for this disease. For specific wheat disease management recommendations or assistance with disease identification, contact Dr. Hillary L. Mehl (hlmehl@vt.edu).

--Hillary Mehl, Extension Plant Pathologist, Virginia Tech

For more details, go to the FHB Risk assessment tool at http://www.wheatscab.psu.edu

For the latest news and updates from the U.S. Wheat & Barley Scab Initiative, go to https://www.scabusa.org

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